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American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
615 Chestnut St
17th Floor
Philadelphia
PA 19106-4404
USA
[t] +1 215 440 9300
[f] +1 215 440 9313
The American Association for Cancer Research is a professional society of more than 24,000 laboratory and clinical scientists engaged in basic, translational, and clinical cancer research in the United States and more than 60 other countries. Founded in 1907, the AACR has as its mission to accelerate the prevention and cure of cancer through research, education, communication, collaboration and advocacy. Among the means to that end, the association publishes five major peer-reviewed scientific journals: Cancer Research
Research shows that food can have an impact in preventing cancer
08 July, 2007
Researchers don't believe 'you are what you eat' with cancer. That disease is always a direct result of what is, or what isn't, on your dinner plate. But studies into the association between diet and cancer show that food can have an impact in preventing cancer, or in reducing the aggressiveness of the disease.
Lifestyle decisions may alter cancer risk
07 July, 2007
Lifestyle decisions, such as smoking and consumption of fatty foods, have long been linked to increased cancer risk. During recent years, scientists have been seeking to isolate a variety of personal choices that may stave off the onset of cancer or even reduce tumor formation in their early stages.
Vaccine helped stimulate immune cell production in up to 70 percent of patients
06 July, 2007
University of Nottingham researchers observed, in a clinical trial of 67 patients, that when the vaccines were administered before and after surgery to remove cancerous tumors, they helped stimulate immune cell production in up to 70 percent of patients. These results are published in the Clinical Cancer Research.
Smoking and concurrent infection with high levels of virus associated with cervical cancer can greatly increase cancer risk
05 July, 2007
According to a study published in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, cigarette smoking and concurrent infection with high levels of the virus associated with cervical cancer can increase cancer risk by as much as 27 times.
Spotlight on Molecular Profiling launched by NCI scientists
04 July, 2007
National Cancer Institute scientists and their colleagues have introduced a new series of research articles, 'Spotlight on Molecular Profiling,' in the Molecular Cancer Therapeutics*.
Physically activity can reduce risk of smokers developing lung cancer
03 July, 2007
Researchers found, in a study of more than 36,000 women, that smokers can reduce their risk of developing lung cancer by being physically active. However, they strongly caution that any relative benefit is dwarfed by the benefits gained from quitting smoking.
Smokers reducing amount of cigarettes still experience greater exposure to toxins
02 July, 2007
According to a new study by researchers at the University of Minnesota, heavy smokers who have reduced their number of daily cigarettes still experience significantly greater exposure to toxins per cigarette than light smokers.
Nearly half of smokers who had surgery for early stage lung cancer smoked again
01 July, 2007
Close to half of 154 smokers who had surgery to remove early stage lung cancer picked up a cigarette again within 12 months of their potentially curative operation, and more than one-third were smoking at the one year mark, a study has found.
Human pancreatic cancer stem cells identified
01 July, 2007
University of Michigan Medical Center researchers have, for the first time, identified human pancreatic cancer stem cells.
Biomarkers found with potential to predict breast cancer spread
30 June, 2007
According to researchers, expression of two different proteins taken from primary tumor biopsies is highly associated with spread of breast cancer to nearby lymph nodes. They say this protein profile could help identify at an early stage those patients whose disease is likely to metastasize.
Scientists detect cancer-causing chemicals associated with tobacco smoke in the urine of babies of smoking parents
30 June, 2007
When mom or dad puffs on a cigarette, their infants may inhale the resulting second-hand smoke. Now, scientists have detected cancer-causing chemicals associated with tobacco smoke in the urine of nearly half the babies of smoking parents.
MicroRNA molecules help control oncogene responsible for dangerous form of leukemia
29 June, 2007
Ohio State University researchers have discovered that two microRNA molecules help control the oncogene responsible for a dangerous form of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the most common human leukemia in the world.
Juice packs a punch on prostate cancer
29 June, 2007
According to a study published in the Clinical Cancer Research, pomegranate juice packs a punch on prostate cancer that prolongs post-surgery PSA doubling time, drives down cancer cell proliferation and causes prostate cancer cells to die.
New biomarker raises hope of earlier detection and better treatment of breast cancer
28 June, 2007
Dartmouth Medical School researchers have linked a structural protein called nestin to a particularly deadly form of breast cancer, identifying a new biomarker that could lead to earlier detection and better treatment.
Risk of developing tissue abnormalities higher for women infected with multiple genotypes
28 June, 2007
According to a study published in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, the risk for developing the tissue abnormalities, or lesions, that typically precede cervical cancer is much higher for women infected with multiple genotypes of the human papillomavirus than previously reported.
DNA coughed up with phlegm could point to lung cancer
27 June, 2007
University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers who are developing an inexpensive and non-invasive gene probe to help diagnose early stage lung cancer in current and former smokers say DNA coughed up along with phlegm could point to lung cancer
Higher risk of developing breast cancer for 'DES daughters'
27 June, 2007
Flaws in cancer clinical trials found by researchers
26 June, 2007
According to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, cancer research and drug development are yielding more sophisticated candidate therapies, but investigators' methods to test them haven't kept pace.
Stem cell-like glioma cancer cells could hold key to brain tumor therapy
26 June, 2007
A research team reported in the Cancer Research that stem cell-like glioma cancer cells that share many characteristics with normal stem cells propel the lethal growth of brain cancers by promoting tumor blood vessel formation, and may hold the key to treating these deadly cancers.
Breast tumours fought off by peptide vaccine
25 June, 2007
Assisted by immune system-stimulating molecules that mimic bacterial components, researchers have used a type of cancer vaccine to both delay and prevent breast tumors in mice.
Research and drug development are yielding more sophisticated candidate therapies
25 June, 2007
According to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, cancer research and drug development are yielding more sophisticated candidate therapies, but investigators' methods to test them haven't kept pace. That could explain why so many experimental drugs fail in the final large and costly phase of testing, they say.
Vitamin D tablets found to cut the risk of pancreatic cancer
24 June, 2007
According to a study led by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard universities, consumption of Vitamin D tablets was found to cut the risk of pancreatic cancer nearly in half.
Drug protects postmenopausal women from developing invasive breast cancer
23 June, 2007
According to a study, Raloxifene protects postmenopausal women from developing invasive breast cancer whether they are at high or low risk of developing the disease.
tNOX may be more reliable than standard prostate specific antigen test
22 June, 2007
Purdue University researchers have found a protein in the blood that may prove to be more reliable than the standard prostate specific antigen test in measuring the extent of prostate cancer.
Lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers
21 June, 2007
As diseases go, lung cancer is one of the most formidable. While it is one of the most preventable cancers, with the vast majority of 160,000 annual deaths in the United States due to smoking, it is invariably difficult to find early when it is most amenable to treatment. As a result, it remains the top cancer killer in the nation.
REG1A and EXTL3 genes are overexpressed in colorectal tumors of patients who are at high risk of recurrence
20 June, 2007
According to a new study from the Max Delbrueck Center in Berlin, Germany, two genes, known as REG1A and EXTL3, are overexpressed in colorectal tumors of patients who are at high risk of recurrence.
Researchers find molecular markers flagging presence of small metastases before reaching life-threatening size
19 June, 2007
Patients with melanoma of the eye are at risk for liver metastases, which are often not detected until they have turned into large, lethal tumors. Now researchers have found molecular markers, including changes in a particular chromosome, that flag the presence of small metastases before they reach life-threatening size.
Early metastasis of breast cancer detected by new technique
18 June, 2007
According to research presented at the first international meeting on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development, organized by the American Association for Cancer Research, in the U.S. a novel technology soon may be available to detect the spread, or metastasis, of breast cancer earlier than now possible.
Protein in blood may prove to be a biomarker
17 June, 2007
A Maryland-based pharmaceutical company has preliminary evidence showing that a protein in the blood may prove to be a biomarker that is more sensitive and specific than current methods of early detection for prostate cancer.
Pancreatic cancer stem cells indentified by researchers
16 June, 2007
University of Michigan Medical Center scientists have, for the first time, identified human pancreatic cancer stem cells. Their work indicates that these cells are likely responsible for the aggressive tumor growth, progression, and metastasis that define this deadly cancer.
New method to detect a spectrum of known gene mutations in a variety of cancer
16 June, 2007
Scientists have devised a new method to detect a spectrum of known gene mutations in a variety of cancer genes that they say is both sensitive and cost-effective. They say that if validated, this method of genotyping might ultimately be used in
Colorectal carcinomas, new biomarker for survival prediction revealed
15 June, 2007
According to a study at Yale University School of Medicine, levels of a protein called thymidylate synthase within two separate compartments of a tumor cell, the nucleus and the cytoplasm, may be critical markers predicting survival in colorectal cancer.
Researchers find angiogenesis inhibitors effective in metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer treatment
14 June, 2007
According to accumulating evidence, angiogenesis inhibitors can be far more effective in treating metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer, an aggressive form of the most common kind of kidney cancer that is also rich in blood supply, than traditional treatments. They can prolong life in about a third of patients, but researchers have not been able to identify the responding patients, prior to treatment.
Test discovered to predict prognosis with treatment of p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy
13 June, 2007
A routine laboratory test that predicted poor outcome from traditional radiation and chemotherapy treatment for head and neck cancers has now been found to predict a good prognosis with treatment of p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy, making it potentially the first predictive biomarker test for a gene-based drug.
Helping physicians decide when to switch from Gleevec to Sutent
12 June, 2007
Scientists have discovered that the same gene mutation responsible for a tepid response to Gleevec (imatinib) in treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, bestows benefit when a newer targeted therapy, Sutent (sunitinib), is used.
Possible biomarker for gauging anti-angiogenic drugs effectiveness
11 June, 2007
According to National Cancer Institute research, if an anti-angiogenic drug is successfully starving a cancer patient
Test helps identify patients with breast cancer who will likely benefit from chemotherapy and those who won
10 June, 2007
According to researchers, a test that measures the amounts of 2 members of the same protein family, one of which appears to act as an oncogene, and the other as a tumor suppressor, helps identify patients with breast cancer who will likely benefit from chemotherapy and those who won
Chemical form of vitamin E dramatically reduced spread of aggressive mammary cancer in mice
09 June, 2007
According to a report in journal Cancer Research, achemically altered form of vitamin E mixed into mouse chow dramatically reduced spread of aggressive mammary cancer in mice, suggesting that the compound in pill form could be used to treat human metastatic cancer.
Chemicals found in grape seeds significantly inhibited growth of colorectal tumors in both cell cultures and in mice
08 June, 2007
According to researchers who have already demonstrated the extract's anti-cancer effects in other tumor types, chemicals in grape seeds significantly inhibited growth of colorectal tumors in cell cultures & mice
Human papillomavirus test is a better long-term predictor of cervical cell abnormalities than pap smear
07 June, 2007
For younger women, the best initial cervical cancer screening tool is still the traditional Pap smear. However, a large Danish study has found that for older women (age 40 and older), a test for HPV is a much more effective way to screen for potential cancer.
Way to block growth of prostate cancer cells discovered by scientists
06 June, 2007
A specific biochemical pathway by which the sex hormone, androgen, increases levels of harmful chemicals called reactive oxygen species in the prostate gland that play a role in the development of prostate cancer has been discovered by scientists for the first time . They found that a drug that blocks this pathway significantly prolonged survival and inhibited tumour development in mice that were genetically engineered to spontaneously develop prostate cancer and die of the disease.
Embryonic stem cell vaccinations prevent lung cancer in mice
05 June, 2007
American researchers have found that vaccinating mice with embryonic stem cells prevented lung cancer in those animals that had cancer cells transplanted into them after the vaccination or that had been exposed to cancer-causing chemicals.
MEK Enzyme inhibitor is capable of producing stable disease in patients with advanced solid cell cancers
04 June, 2007
Early tests of a MEK enzyme inhibitor have shown that it can produce long-lasting stable disease in patients with advanced solid cancers. Trials showed that the drug inhibited key targets in the patients' tumours, and now it is being tested in phase II clinical trials.
Diptheria toxin and interleukin 2 help immune system kill melanoma in humans
03 June, 2007
Researchers who are studying ways of prompting the immune system to recognise and kill tumour cells have found that a drug containing parts of the diptheria toxin appears to work well in patients with advanced melanoma (skin cancer). In the first part of a phase II clinical trial to test the drug denileukin diftitox, also known as DAB(389)IL2 or ONTAK, in melanoma five out of seven patients with stage IV disease experienced significant regression or stabilisation of both tumours and metastases. The two other patients in whom the disease progressed were on a lower dose of the drug. All the patients are still alive after one year.
Systemic treatment ahead of surgery for kidney cancer extends patients
02 June, 2007
Initial results from a phase II clinical trial have shown that treating patients with kidney cancer with bevacizumab and erlotinib1 prior to surgery is safe, effective and may extend patients' survival.
Researchers can now say that cancer genes are detectable smokers' breath.
01 June, 2007
Researchers say they can now detect 'cancer genes' in the breath of smokers, and also test the presence of two proteins in men they say will predict development of prostate cancer a decade in advance. Scientists at the American Association for Cancer Research's Frontiers say ths shows how it is becoming increasingly possible to use genes and their protein products to help predict and diagnose cancer, as well as choose therapy that offers the most potential for a good result.
PSA-activated protoxin has been designed which can kill prostate cancer
01 June, 2007
A new way has been found that can find and destroy prostrate cancer by using a protein. The new treatment studies show that it only affected the prostate and did not affect any other tissue.
Apoptotic and anti-angiogenic therapies have proven to work
01 June, 2007
American researchers have discoverd that a combination of a drug that induces cell death (apoptosis) and imantanib (Glivec1) has returned an improved performance at proventing the growth of Ewing's sarcoma in mice than either therapy on its own.
Novel vaccine shows promise against early stage breast cancer
30 May, 2007
A diagnosis of breast cancer has taken on a new meaning in the past 10 years, as research has produced a host of new therapies and detection techniques, significantly improving long-term survival for women who have been fighting the disease. To build on these successes, researchers are now harnessing what they have learned about treating breast cancer and applying it to possible methods of prevention to reduce the total incidence of the disease.
What does the public really know about HPV?
28 May, 2007
Human papillomaviruses are the most common sexually transmitted infections in the United States, and certain 'high risk' types have been shown to cause cervical cancer. Despite recent advances in the detection and prevention of HPV, the link between the virus and cervical cancer is not well known to the public. The Food and Drug Administration approved the first vaccine to prevent infection of two high risk types of HPV, and two types that cause genital warts. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended it for females 9 to 26 years of age.
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