Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
Company Directory
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1201 West Gregory
Urbana
IL-61822
USA
[t] +1 217 244 2880
[f] +1 217 265 5066
The Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was established in 2003 to advance life science research and stimulate bio-economic development in the state of Illinois.

Construction of the $75 million, 186,000 square foot state-of-the-art IGB facility began in April 2004. When complete in mid-2006, the facility will house up to 400 researchers in three broad Program Areas:

Systems Biology
Cellular and Metabolic Engineering
Genome Technology

The problems facing humanity and the life sciences are significant. Research at the IGB will address those problems, and will provide a stimulating environment for conducting interdisciplinary research at the cutting edge of the life sciences revolution.
New material structure produces world's fastest transistor
11 April, 2005
A new type of transistor structure, invented by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has broken the 600 gigahertz speed barrier. The goal of a terahertz transistor for high-speed computing and communications applications could now be within reach.
Carbon nanotubes yield a new class of biological sensors
13 December, 2004
Nanotechnology researchers at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated a tiny, implantable detector that could one day allow diabetics to monitor their glucose levels continuously-without ever having to draw a blood sample.
Taking the next step toward growing our own fuel
31 October, 2004
Developing a petroleum-free fuel from corn byproducts is one of the goals of a newly named research theme at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo