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Washington University in St Louis
Alumni House
Box 1070
St. Louis
MO 63130
+1
[t] 314-935-5272
[f] 314 935-4259
Washington University in St. Louis is a medium-sized, independent research university dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world. The university is counted among the world's leaders in teaching and research and draws students and faculty to St. Louis from all 50 states and more than 90 other nations. With 6,509 undergraduates and 5,579 graduate and professional students, as well as 1,384 part-time students, Washington University offers more than 90 programs and nearly 1,500 courses in a broad spectrum of traditional and interdisciplinary majors.

Founded in 1853 by St. Louisans, Washington University is highly regarded for its commitment to excellence in learning. Its programs, administration, facilities, resources, and activities combine to further its mission of teaching, research, and service to society.

Set amid a thriving metropolitan region of 2.6 million residents, the University benefits from the vast array of social, cultural, and recreational opportunities offered by the St. Louis area. Bordered on the east by St. Louis' famed Forest Park and on the north, west, and south by well-established suburbs, the 169-acre Hilltop Campus features predominantly Collegiate Gothic architecture, including a number of buildings on the National Register of Historic Places.
Biodefense research is focus of new Midwest Center
27 August, 2006
The United States Department of Health and Human Services announced today that Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis will anchor a multi-institutional Midwest Regional Center for Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research. The center will be funded by a five-year, $35 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Mouse model offers new explanation for kidney disease and failure
27 August, 2006
Mice lacking only one copy of the gene for CD2-associated protein appear to be significantly more susceptible to kidney disease and failure than normal mice. Moreover, the mutation appears to impair the elimination of proteins that accumulate in the kidney, a previously unidentified process.
Treatment for depression in heart attack patients fails to improve survival
27 August, 2006
A team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., the Harvard School of Public Health and several other clinical centers around the United States has found that treating depression and social isolation in recent heart attack patients does not reduce the risk of death or second heart attack.
New approach could restore reading vision
26 August, 2006
Scientists at the Veterans Affairs Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are developing a gel-like material that eventually could be used to replace diseased and aging lenses in the eyes of patients with cataracts. The material also might eventually mean the end of bifocals and contact lenses for millions of people who suffer from presbyopia, literally 'old vision', a condition that makes it difficult for people over 40 to read without magnification.
New study - Treatment for depression in heart attack patients fails to improve survival
26 August, 2006
A team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., the Harvard School of Public Health and several other clinical centers around the United States has found that treating depression and social isolation in recent heart attack patients does not reduce the risk of death or second heart attack.
Researchers image cells
26 August, 2006
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have imaged the activity of an important component of the cell
Transplantation of embryonic pancreatic tissue controls Type I Diabetes in rats
25 August, 2006
When researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis transplanted early embryonic pancreatic tissue into the abdomens of adult rats with type I diabetes, the animals developed organs that produced insulin and controlled blood-sugar levels. The animals were cured of their diabetes for the duration of the experiment, which lasted 15 weeks.
Research suggests how steroids cause diabetes and hypertension
25 August, 2006
Steroids called glucocorticoids are critical for treating diseases such as asthma, arthritis and pain syndromes, but they also can trigger diabetes and hypertension. Research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis now shows why these commonly used drugs have such dangerous side effects.
National emphysema results confirm Washington University findings
25 August, 2006
Cooper pioneered lung-volume reduction surgery in 1993, in which surgeons remove heavily damaged portions of lungs in patients with severe emphysema. Results from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, conducted independently of Washington University, will be presented May 20 at the American Thoracic Society
Molecule found to be critical for kidney development
24 August, 2006
By taking advantage of techniques developed in the search for Alzheimer
Drug for bone loss triggers first known case of drug-induced Osteopetrosis
24 August, 2006
A drug used to treat bone loss associated with diseases such as osteoporosis has caused a child to develop an unhealthy, dense skeleton characteristic of a condition called osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease.
Washington University Physicians investigate artificial disc replacement
24 August, 2006
Washington University Physicians at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis are testing an investigational treatment for cervical disc disease that involves replacing a diseased spinal disc in the neck with an artificial one.
Driving performance declines with dementia and age
23 August, 2006
In one of the first studies to track driving performance over time in older adults, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found that driving abilities predictably worsen in individuals with early Alzheimer
Researchers find engthening achilles tendon reduces recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers
23 August, 2006
Some people with diabetes struggle with ulcers forming on the bottom of their feet; worse yet, many of these ulcers come back after treatment. A study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that a surgical procedure to lengthen the Achilles tendons of patients with diabetes significantly reduces the risk of ulcer recurrence.
Pain management: Rapid increase of opioids benefits some dying pediatric cancer patients
23 August, 2006
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that terminally ill children with cancer who have neuropathic pain require more opioids during the final days of life than those without neuropathic pain.
Brain-fluid sampling gives glimpse into Alzheimer
22 August, 2006
A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, in collaboration with researchers at Eli Lilly and Co. in Indianapolis, have developed a new technique that, for the first time, provides a way to dynamically study proteins known to be related to Alzheimer
Antidepressant drugs may protect brain from damage due to depression
22 August, 2006
Studying women with histories of clinical depression, investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that the use of antidepressant drugs appears to protect a key brain structure often damaged by depression.
Researchers discover gene that contributes to sense of balance
22 August, 2006
New Model of Alzheimer's Enzyme May Help Refine Future Treatments
21 August, 2006
An international team of scientists led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the enzyme largely responsible for the development of Alzheimer's disease may work in a different way than previously thought.
One gene controls development of all serotonin cells
21 August, 2006
Mice missing a gene called Lmx1b do not produce the important brain chemical serotonin, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. This is the first evidence that one gene controls development of all cells that produce serotonin in the central nervous system, marking significant progress in understanding this critical nervous system pathway.
Atkins
21 August, 2006
In the first multicenter trial to look at the high-fat, low-carbohydrate Atkins
Gene linked to both alcoholism and depression
20 August, 2006
A national team of investigators led by psychiatric geneticists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified a gene that appears to be linked to both alcoholism and depression.
Diabetes and heart disease risk is unchanged after fat is removed
20 August, 2006
Liposuction is no substitute for dieting when it comes to preventing diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Brain areas involved in reading change during development
20 August, 2006
Children, adolescents and adults use their brains differently during a simple reading task, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the team identified 17 brain regions that distinguish the three age groups.
Study to determine if miscarriages can be prevented
19 August, 2006
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are seeking women who have had two or more unexplained first trimester miscarriages to evaluate an experimental treatment to help women carry babies to term.
Newly grown kidneys sustain life in rats
19 August, 2006
Growing new organs to take the place of damaged or diseased ones is moving from science fiction to reality, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Implanted Stimulator for Parkinson's Disease Impairs Cognitive Function
19 August, 2006
Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that stimulating the brain's subthalamic nucleus to control motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease has an unintended consequence: It interferes with cognitive function. When given cognitive tests, patients performed better when their stimulators were turned off than when they were turned on.
Longevity study will investigate exceptionally long and healthy lives
18 August, 2006
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis will head an ambitious study of people who live exceptionally long and healthy lives to identify the factors that account for their longevity.
Lack of immune system protein prevents lupus-like condition in mice
18 August, 2006
Removal of an immune system signaling protein prevents the development of a lupus-like condition in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health have found.
Researchers identify key risk factor for cataracts
18 August, 2006
Ophthalmology researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a key risk factor for the development of cataracts. For the first time, they have demonstrated an association between loss of gel in the eye's vitreous body, the gel that lies between the back of the lens and the retina, and the formation of nuclear cataracts, the most common type of age-related cataracts.
Genetically modified parasite reveals new details of immune system's memory
17 August, 2006
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Pennsylvania have found an immune system cell can 'remember' a parasite's attack and help the body mount a more effective defense against subsequent invasions by the same parasite.
Scientists discover new intricacies in how ulcer bugs stick to stomach
17 August, 2006
Scientists working to develop a vaccine for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the primary cause of ulcers and a contributor to stomach cancers, have uncovered new intricacies in the way the bacterium sticks to the lining of the human stomach.
Thyroid cancer study simplifies follow-up exams for patients
17 August, 2006
An unpleasant postoperative procedure for thyroid cancer patients who have had their thyroid glands surgically removed may be unnecessary for most patients, according to Washington University researchers at Siteman Cancer Center and Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis.
Scientists close in on nerve proteins' contributions to memory and hearing loss
16 August, 2006
In a finding that may one day help researchers better understand age-related memory and hearing loss, scientists have shown that two key nervous system proteins interact in a manner that helps regulate the transmission of signals in the nervous system.
Firefly compound lights up 'protein dance' in living animals
16 August, 2006
Radiologists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a first-of-its-kind noninvasive imaging technique that allows them to watch two proteins interacting in live animals.
Protein may help prevent autoimmune attacks
16 August, 2006
A possibly important ally of the immune system that can help with the tricky task of separating friend from foe has been identified by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Diabetic tissue damage may be explained by controversial theory
15 August, 2006
A controversial theory about how diabetes causes extensive tissue damage will appear in the November issue of Diabetes. At stake in the heated debate over the theory are researchers' efforts to find new ways to reduce loss of vision, kidney failure, heart damage and other side effects of diabetes.
Longevity protein may slow many neurodegenerative disorders
15 August, 2006
A protein linked to increased lifespan in yeast and worms also can delay the degeneration of ailing nerve cell branches, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Patient benefits outweigh gown costs in intensive care unit
15 August, 2006
Requiring hospital workers and patient families to wear protective gowns when they visit patients with a drug-resistant bacteria provides infection control benefits that significantly outweigh gown costs, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Neurotransmitters signal aggressive cancer, offer potential for early diagnosis
14 August, 2006
Nerves talk to each other using chemicals called neurotransmitters. One of those 'communication chemicals,' aptly named gamma amino butyric acid, shows up in unusually high amounts in some aggressive tumors, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Gut microbes can open gates in fat cells
14 August, 2006
The microorganisms that normally live in the gut can increase body fat, say researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. They found that gut microbes can open the 'gates' fat uses to enter the body's fat cells.
Scientists suspect existing seizure, nerve pain drug may also treat tinnitus
14 August, 2006
Millions of people with severe tinnitus currently have little hope for quick relief from the unrelenting ringing or buzzing noises the disorder produces. But scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suspect a drug already approved for seizure disorders and chronic nerve pain also can help silence the noises that plague tinnitus patients.
Laproscopic colon cancer surgery is effective and less invasive
14 August, 2006
Getting treated for a common type of cancer just became easier: An international team of surgeons including two at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has determined that minimally invasive surgery is as safe and effective as standard open surgery for most patients with cancer confined to the colon.
New study helps doctors decide when it's safe to deliver a baby
13 August, 2006
If a woman goes into labor before her baby is full term, her obstetrician must make a crucial recommendation: delay labor or allow it to continue. Delivering the baby prematurely may increase the baby's risk of suffering from neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially fatal condition.
Scientists first to grow common cause of food poisoning in the lab
13 August, 2006
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have become the first to successfully grow a norovirus in the lab. In humans, noroviruses are a highly contagious source of diarrhea, vomiting and other stomach upset that made headlines two years ago after a series of repeated outbreaks on cruise ships. These viruses are a major cause of human disease worldwide.
Closing in on a vaccine for breast cancer
12 August, 2006
Progress toward development of a breast cancer vaccine has been reported by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and the Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis.
First analysis of chicken genome offers many new insights
12 August, 2006
The first detailed analysis of the chicken genome has identified a chicken counterpart to an important human immune system protein, revised scientists' assessment of the chicken's sense of smell, and suggested that the chicken, long used to study gene activity in the earliest stages of life, may provide a good model for studying changes in DNA linked to aging and death.
Mouse brain tumors mimic those in human genetic disorder
12 August, 2006
A recently developed mouse model of brain tumors common in the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis 1 successfully mimics the human condition and provides unique insight into tumor development, diagnosis and treatment, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Effective therapies for bipolar children sought through TEAM study
11 August, 2006
Child psychiatry researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are investigating the effectiveness of several therapies for children with bipolar disorder, also known as manic depressive illness.
Kinder, gentler procedure gives superior results for stem cell transplants
11 August, 2006
An improved stem cell transplant regimen that is well-tolerated and has a high success rate has been developed by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The procedure holds promise for treatment of blood and bone marrow disorders, immune dysfunction and certain metabolic disorders.
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