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News

ABB drives bring water to China

ABB Automation Technologies : 18 March, 2007  (Company News)
ABB drive packages will power the heart of a key pumping station in the middle route of China
ABB will deliver eight sets of 7.3 megawatt ACS6000 drives packages, including transformers, frequency converters and machines to power the stations’ centrifugal water pumps and machinery.

Water shortages
About one-third of China is very dry or a desert. The most arid regions are in the north and northwest, while each year China’s south is plagued by torrential rains and floods. In recent years, massive economic growth has compelled the country to launch new steps to manage, preserve and redistribute its precious water resources.

About one-third of China is very dry or a desert, and the most arid regions are in the north and northwest.

This includes the multi-billion dollar south-to-north water diversion projects, the largest scheme of its kind in the world. This ambitious undertaking will send billions of cubic meters of water from the south to satisfy spiraling demand for water in the country’s dry, resource-rich north, where booming populations in Beijing and Tianjin, massive construction and an arid climate have conspired to create chronic water shortages.

Three diversion routes
The south-to-north projects consists of three, thousand-kilometer-long water diversion routes in the eastern, middle and western parts of China that will use existing or new rivers, channels, reservoirs and canals to transport water from the south to the north.

Planning of the south-to-north diversion projects began in the 1950s, and is the entire scheme is expected to take about 50 years to complete.

These three routes will eventually link the country's four major rivers - the Yangtze River, Yellow River, Huaihe River and the Haihe River, and create a huge, controllable water net system that can allocate and regulate China’s water resources.

The middle way
The 1,267-kilometer-long middle route will bring water from the Yangtze River up to the capital of Beijing by 2010. And because the route is not always flat, water must be pumped over obstacles.

Huinanzhuang is the only major pump station to be built in the main channel of the middle diversion route.

Planning of the south-to-north diversion projects began in the 1950s, and is the entire scheme is expected to take about 50 years to complete. The Chinese government expects to be able to divert 44.8 billion cubic meters of water annually by 2050.
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