Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Headbands provide minimal protection for soccer players

Washington University In St Louis : 10 January, 2003  (Technical Article)
Headbands intended to protect soccer players from head injuries are effective only at high speeds, according to research at Washington University in St. Louis. The team found that all four brands of commercial headbands eased the impact of a soccer ball at the highest speeds and pressures tested, but failed to reduce the force at slower speeds.
Headbands intended to protect soccer players from head injuries are effective only at high speeds, according to research at Washington University in St. Louis. The team found that all four brands of commercial headbands eased the impact of a soccer ball at the highest speeds and pressures tested, but failed to reduce the force at slower speeds.

“These early findings imply that soccer headgear is not very protective during run-of-the-mill impacts in soccer, but may protect against more severe collisions, such as hitting a goalpost or another player’s head,” says Rosanne S. Naunheim, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the School of Medicine. “Effectively, these headbands protect players against the same things a helmet would protect them from, but do not provide specific protection against hitting a soccer ball.”

Naunheim led the study along with Phil Bayly, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering.

About 200 million people worldwide play soccer, yet there is little research on the neurological dangers of hitting a soccer ball with the head, a common practice called
“heading.”

“It’s going to take long-term studies to find out precisely how dangerous it is to hit a soccer ball with your head,” says Naunheim.

Naunheim and a team of engineers at Washington University are exploring the physical properties and neurological repercussions of soccer heading. Meanwhile, they tested four brands of headbands currently available using a magnesium head-simulator. Soccer balls were projected from 10 feet away at 20, 26 and 34 mph, three common speeds during soccer. The team also tested two levels of ball inflation to measure the effect of ball pressure.

All four headbands significantly changed the impact of the ball when it was fully inflated and projected at the highest speed. However, at all other speeds, none of the headgear provided significant protection against impact, regardless of inflation.

“At the highest speeds there’s a possible protective effect, so there might be an even greater effect at faster speeds,” says Naunheim.

Since soccer balls can reach velocities of 85 mph in professional matches, the team plans to test the headbands under more forceful conditions.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   Â© 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo