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News

LGC launches the Analytical Route Map, a web resource for scientists in industry

LGC : 15 April, 2002  (Company News)
LGC, the UK's leading independent analytical laboratory, has launched a new interactive web site for analytical scientists and laboratory managers based in industry. Sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), the Analytical Route Map at www.anamap.co.uk provides a problem solving resource and non-commercial practical advice on specialist techniques, from active ultrasound spectroscopy to electroseparations.
Dr Peter Lyne, LGC, who headed the DTI programme that produced the site, said: 'Chemical analysis or testing can confront us with the unexpected. An oddly behaved sample or a novel customer request can leave any one of us feeling perplexed and 'put on the spot'. This quandary is magnified for those working alone, as specialists in small companies, or researchers using analytical tests to meet urgent deadlines. It was with this issue in mind that LGC decided to create an interactive web site. Firstly, to provide a methodology for tackling unfamiliar problems in analytical chemistry. Secondly, to present analytical techniques developed during the DTI programme in user-friendly format.'

Sophie Gabriac, LGC, who co-ordinates content for the site, explains: 'The Analytical Route Map saves scientists valuable research time. It works by posing a series of multiple choice questions to define a specific problem. Any difficult or vague term is explained in a definition box, which helps the user to make a decision. During this dialogue, a history file builds up, allowing the enquirer to return to previous questions. A series of possible solutions is then generated, supported by up-to-date, accurate information. At the end of the virtual analysis, methods and any relevant definitions can be printed in a table or a flow chart.'

Dr Richard Worswick, LGC's Chief Executive, commented: 'We are delighted that LGC has had the opportunity to support DTI in developing innovative analytical techniques through the DTI's Analytical Innovation Programme. The Analytical Route Map enables LGC to share the programme's legacy with a wider audience, and to encourage an awareness of future technologies in chemical analysis. This new web-based resource places analytical science firmly on the map as a problem solving discipline, from the logical network of the Map itself, to the novel approach to problem solving it demonstrates.'
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