Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

New method could reduce fabrication costs and increase use of titanium and other metals

DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory : 02 August, 2006  (Technical Article)
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new method for powder injection molding of titanium and similar materials to form components for advanced engineering applications.
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new method for powder injection molding of titanium and similar materials to form components for advanced engineering applications.

Titanium offers high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, making it ideally suited to the automotive, aerospace, chemical production and biomedical equipment industries. However, use of injection molded titanium components has been severely limited by alloy impurities directly attributable to the current process.

The PNNL method overcomes these problems, allowing powder injection molding to be readily used in preparing components from alloys of titanium, tungsten, and niobium, as well as other reactive refractory materials. The key to the PNNL process is a proprietary binder that is cleanly removed during sintering and leaves no impurities that can cause degradation in material properties.

In addition, the porosity of components produced by the PNNL process can be tailored for a variety of specialized applications, including the design of self-lubricating parts and biomedical implants. This is accomplished by including easily removed fugitive phases in the powder mixture and by controlling the subsequent debinding and sintering heat treatments.

Derived from plastic injection molding, powder injection molding employs a mixture of metal powder and polymeric binder. It is a well established, cost-effective method of fabricating large volumes of small- to moderate-size, net shape components and can be used to produce parts of complex shape. Because fabrication temperatures are relatively low (~150 - 250C), the molds employed in powder injection molding are less expensive than those used in other forming techniques, such as die casting or forging.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo