Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

New solution to stop tooth rot

Society For General Microbiology : 06 September, 2004  (New Product)
About half of today's children have tooth decay, so a new solution that blocks the action of bacteria which attack teeth could bring significant benefits, say scientists speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
About half of today's children have tooth decay, so a new solution that blocks the action of bacteria which attack teeth could bring significant benefits, say scientists speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.

Researchers from the Department of Oral Immunology at King's College London have discovered how the bacteria which attack teeth, Streptococcus mutans, attach themselves to the enamel surface. Once stuck on, the bacteria convert sugar from our food into acid which then attacks the tooth surface.

'The bacteria use a special protein to recognise teeth, and it fits snugly into their surface like a key fitting into a lock. We have identified the small part of the protein which acts like the key,' says Professor Charles Kelly of King's College London. 'We made identical copies of the small part of the protein, called a peptide, and dripped it onto the teeth of volunteers to see whether it would block up all the possible keyholes, stopping bacteria from attaching to the teeth themselves.'

After three weeks of treatment with the peptide solution the volunteers were monitored for the next three months to see whether any of them became infected with tooth decay bacteria. None of the treated volunteers suffered any tooth decay infection, while other volunteers who received no treatment, or a solution containing a similar but useless peptide, did become infected with Streptococcus mutans.

This study has provided important evidence that a simple peptide could provide a protective solution to tooth decay, by preventing the attacking bacteria from attaching to tooth enamel. Eventually the scientists hope other types of infection might be blocked using the same technique.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo