Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Rainfall may affect geological structure of Pacific Northwest mountain range

Yale University : 10 December, 2003  (New Product)
Heavy rainfall causes both higher surface erosion rate and upheaval of underlying bedrock in the Washington Cascades mountain range of the Pacific Northwest, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.
Heavy rainfall causes both higher surface erosion rate and upheaval of underlying bedrock in the Washington Cascades mountain range of the Pacific Northwest, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.

Using a low temperature radioisotopic dating method that determines when and how fast erosion brings bedrock towards the surface of the Earth, Peter Reiners, assistant professor of geology and geophysics and lead author of the study, and his co-researchers, found evidence to support long-standing theories about the interplay of climate, erosion, and tectonics.

'People have long thought that the scale and pattern of rock uplift is mostly controlled by deep, plate-tectonic forces,'Reiners said. 'Based on our findings, it's not too much of a stretch to say the pattern of bedrock uplift is closely tied to climate, through erosion.'

The pattern of rainfall may cause bedrock to be pulled up towards the Earth's surface faster in some places than others, he said.

This data is the first convincing evidence for such effects on a mountain range scale over a period of millions of years.

'Geologists usually think of erosion wearing away mountains,' said David Fountain, program director in the National Science Foundation's division of earth sciences, which funded the research. 'These results, however, show that erosion can be an important player in uplift of mountain ranges, especially in mountainous regions that receive heavy precipitation.'

The rainfall is heavy in parts of the North American Pacific Northwest because moist air moving east from the Pacific rises and cools as it encounters the ranges, dumping large amounts of rain and snow on the west side of the Cascades, where it rains about 10 times more than most places in Washington.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo