Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Removing the safety barriers from robots

ABB Limited (Group Headquarters) : 27 July, 2006  (New Product)
The SafeMove concept comes about as a result of the continuing evolution of safety standards for robot and automation systems. Today, traditional safety systems require more guarding, more emergency stops and more equipment to separate the operator from the robot. These concepts are restrictive expensive and often inefficient.
The SafeMove concept comes about as a result of the continuing evolution of safety standards for robot and automation systems. Today, traditional safety systems require more guarding, more emergency stops and more equipment to separate the operator from the robot. These concepts are restrictive expensive and often inefficient.

The updated standard ISO 10218, Parts 1 and 2 which will be released soon, address the integration of robots in an automation system. The new standards will allow a significant evolution of robot products and the way they are installed. A major advance will enable certified software solutions for safety functions to be used where previously only hardware could be applied.

The SafeMove concept will take advantage of these changes by offering new safety functionality based around dedicated electronics, negating the need for position switches and mechanical guards around the robots. SafeMove is able to monitor a real-time software model of the robot. It continually compares the real robot movements to that model to enable the robot to take avoidance actions in the event of something being placed into its path.

According to David Marshall of ABB, early adopters for this technology are likely to be the automotive industry and automotive part markers in Germany and the US, but he expects the technology to become more mainstream, throughout manufacturing industry within the next few years.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo