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News

Research study testing statins to slow Alzheimer's

Duke University Pratt School Of Engineering : 06 August, 2004  (Technical Article)
Early research suggests that statins, drugs commonly taken to control cholesterol and prevent heart disease, may also help slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. A national study is now underway to test several medications for this purpose.
Americans are living longer, and medicine is looking for new ways to keep us physically and mentally healthy as we age. In addition to a heart-healthy lifestyle, researchers think certain medications may also help stave off Alzheimer's disease and other age-related degenerative brain disorders. Dr Murali Doraiswamy, chief of the Division of Biological Psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center, is leading Duke's participation in a national study funded by the National Institutes of Health. 'Although this is not proven, many of the drugs that we thought were effective only for treating heart disease or diabetes may also be surprisingly useful for either delaying Alzheimer's disease or for improving brain function.' The drugs to be studied at Duke are statins, which help control cholesterol. 'We are conducting a large research study at Duke, which is part of a national study, to look at whether a certain statin, called simvastatin, may actually be useful for slowing the progress of Alzheimer's disease.' Duke is now enrolling study volunteers. To learn more, call (919) 681-6605. I'm Cabell Smith for MedMinute.
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