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American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
1200 New York Avenue NW
Washington
DC 20005
USA
[t] +1 202 326 6400
The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science (www.sciencemag.org). AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes some 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of one million. The non-profit AAAS (www.aaas.org) is open to all and fulfils its mission to 'advance science and serve society' through initiatives in science policy; international programs; science education; and more.
Scientists explore dramatic changes expected from Nanofabrication
23 July, 2006
A trio of top scientists predicted that nanofabrication in the decades ahead could have an array of uses in daily life, from the development of molecular electronics and optics to the creation of artificial muscles.
Scientists generate patient-specific stem cells
22 July, 2006
A team of scientists in South Korea has isolated the first human embryonic stem cell lines specifically tailored to match the nuclear DNA of patients, both males and females of various ages, suffering from disease or spinal cord injury. The research is being released by the journal Science, which is published by AAAS, the non-profit science society, on the Science Express website.
New insight on deadly Spanish flu may aid flu research
21 July, 2006
Emergency hospital during Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918, Camp Funston, Kansas. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.
New DNA study in Science traces the genetic roots of modern Europeans
20 July, 2006
Photograph of 'Neolithic burial HAL2' from Halberstadt, Germany. This burial exemplifies the Linear Pottery culture of the first Central European farmers, who lived about 7,500 years ago. The banded pottery and the flexed position of the legs are hallmarks of this farming culture.
Synthetic life research shows progress
19 July, 2006
Scientists are becoming increasingly adept at using synthetic building blocks to design and construct living systems, an effort with great promise for the engineering of microbes to make drugs or other valuable products.
New research in Science shows highest CO2 Levels in 650,000 years
18 July, 2006
Thin cut of a polar ice sample illuminated through two polarizing filters. Grain boundaries appear in rainbow colors, the gas bubbles enclosed in the ice are dark. The analysis of the gas composition in these bubbles permits the reconstruction of greenhouse gas concentrations of the past 650,000 years.
New tuberculosis antibiotic may shorten treatment time
17 July, 2006
A new antibiotic shows promise, thus far in mice, for treating tuberculosis much faster than current drugs do, scientists report. Additional evidence indicates that the antibiotic may work against multidrug-resistant strains of the tuberculosis bug. Studies in healthy human volunteers have indicated that the drug is safe for humans to take, and further human studies are currently underway.
New AAAS project will explore geospatial technology and human rights
16 July, 2006
A new year-long AAAS project will explore how satellite imagery and other cutting-edge geospatial technologies can be used to assess potential human rights violations and prevent new ones before they develop.
New discovery of Mars' watery past
16 July, 2006
The discovery of strong evidence that Mars was once awash in potentially life-supporting water has been named as the Breakthrough of the Year by the journal Science and its publisher, AAAS, the nonprofit science society. The findings suggest that Mars was a wet, warm place that could have been capable of nurturing life billions of years ago, when life on Earth was getting its start.
New study in Science warns of greenland
15 July, 2006
East Greenland icebergs. Large numbers of bergs are calved each year from the fast-flowing terminus of Kangerdlussuaq Glacier, East Greenland. Iceberg production is a major form of mass loss from ice sheets.
Prions found in unexpected organs of infected mice
15 July, 2006
Prions, the misfolded proteins implicated in mad cow disease, have been discovered in kidney, pancreas and liver tissues of prion-infected mice with chronic inflammation. These findings highlight the possibility that prions in farm animals with ongoing inflammatory conditions could move from their known range, in nervous and lymphoid tissues, to unexpected organs.
Stem cell experts assess the impact of hwang fraud on research, public trust
14 July, 2006
Some of the nation
Experts predict a nanotech revolution in medicine
14 July, 2006
A panel of top nanotechnology researchers convened by EurekAlert! predicted Wednesday that nanotechnology could have a dramatic impact on medical care in the next 20 years, and they urged their colleagues to help educate the public about the novel treatments to come.
A panel of primate researchers discover new human-like cultural behaviors of orangutans
13 July, 2006
What if making dinner meant climbing to the top of a palm tree, brandishing one of the tree
New research on couch potatoes shed light on obesity
13 July, 2006
Obese 'couch potatoes' sit more and walk less than lean 'couch potatoes' living in the same environment, according in the journal Science. These findings may be important for understanding the biology of obesity and how best to treat this worsening epidemic.
German researchers find new insight on social punishment, human cooperation
12 July, 2006
This cartoon portrays the collapse in cooperation as a result of those who don't contribute to but benefit from the efforts of others. Groups that sanction such free-riders stabilize cooperative behavior and outcompete those that do not.
Saliva tests detect disease, cavities and drug use
12 July, 2006
Researchers at AAAS said that a saliva-based diagnostic is evolving to test for bacteria, viruses, illegal drug use, steroids, antibodies, DNA and RNA, potentially reducing the need for blood and urine testing.
A new component of the brain system that regulates body weight
11 July, 2006
According to a report in the Science, scientists have identified a new component of the brain system that regulates body weight. A select population of neurons in the brain's hypothalamus senses changes in the body's fuel availability and, in turn, influences appetite and metabolism.
New discovery, Use of prozac in young mice may lead to abnormal adult behaviour
11 July, 2006
Mice exposed to a common antidepressant, fluoxetine (Prozac), in early postnatal development exhibited symptoms of depression and anxiety-related emotional disorders in adulthood, according to a new study. The study has potential implications for the prescription of fluoxetine to pregnant women and young children, the researchers said.
New development of sensitive sensors for robotic hands
10 July, 2006
A new type of sensor offers the first step toward giving robotic hands the delicacy of the human touch. The device, described in Science, has tactile sensitivity comparable to that of human fingers and could be useful for the next generation of minimally invasive surgeries.
New discovery, Gene tied to age-related blindness
10 July, 2006
Three independent studies have identified a gene involved in a form of eye damage that is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. This findings may lead to tests that would allow earlier detection of the disorder, known as age-related macular degeneration or AMD, which in turn may lead to better treatments.
Science awaiting details on request to retract stem cell paper
17 July, 2005
Donald Kennedy, Science editor in chief, said Friday that the journal is closely monitoring a controversy that has emerged over a landmark embryonic stem cell paper. The journal has received a request for retraction from the lead authors, Woo Suk Hwang and Gerald Schatten, but Science is withholding action on that request until all 25 co-authors sign off on the request, Kennedy told reporters in a telephonic news conference.
New AAAS security Center holds first congressional briefing
16 July, 2005
The AAAS Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy, founded this year to build new connections between scientists, research institutions and federal policy-makers, held its first briefing for a select audience of congressional staffers in Washington D.C.
The discovery of strong evidence that Mars was once awash in potentially life-supporting water
16 July, 2005
The discovery of strong evidence that Mars was once awash in potentially life-supporting water has been named as the Breakthrough of the Year by the journal Science and its publisher, AAAS, the nonprofit science society. The findings suggest that Mars was a wet, warm place that could have been capable of nurturing life billions of years ago, when life on Earth was getting its start.
Can neuronal replacement slow the mind's aging?
11 July, 2005
Pioneering neurobiologist Fernando Nottebohm told a AAAS audience that, after a career of studying the brains of song-birds, he believes humans may someday be able to replace neurons in the human brain to offset the effects of disease, injury or getting old.
New vaccine for the next influenza pandemic
23 December, 2004
For the first time in history, the virus subtype of a potential pandemic is known, H5N1, and a vaccine against it could be stored for immediate use if needed.
Bison DNA helps explain extinctions
29 November, 2004
Climate and environmental change, not human hunting pressure, served as the primary force that nearly eradicated ancient bison and drove sabre-toothed cats, mammoths and many other large mammals to extinction.
Science survey ranks top biopharma employers
26 November, 2004
Genentech, Inc, of San Francisco, CA, has earned top honours in a ranking of the world's most respected biopharmaceutical employers.
New experimental drug prevents vaginal simian HIV transmission in Monkeys
15 October, 2004
Potentially important insights for understanding vaginal transmission of HIV and designing new HIV prevention strategies may come from a new SHIV study in monkeys.
New research clarifies a major uncertainty about bone marrow donor cells
02 July, 2004
Bone marrow cells have shown a surprising ability to grow in heart, liver, nerve and other cells. These findings have stirred controversy, however, over whether bone marrow cells actually change their genetic program and become these new types of cells. Some researchers have found evidence suggesting that bone marrow cells simply fuse with cells in other organs without actually taking on a new identity.
New book explores how genes and environment influence behavior
25 March, 2004
If your parents are smart, will you be? Can someone be genetically compelled to act rashly? As a relatively new but growing field, behavioral genetics seeks to understand how both genes and environment contribute to the variations in human behavior such as intelligence, lifestyle choices or even proclivity for violence.
Powerful machines are coming in small packages
10 March, 2004
A new class of micro-gadgets, some no larger than a pencil eraser, are poised to make military and other equipment easier to power and carry. Scientists presented the latest developments from their micro-engineering labs at the 2004 AAAS Annual Meeting.
Bison DNA helps explain extinctions
29 November, 2002
Climate and environmental change, not human hunting pressure, served as the primary force that nearly eradicated ancient bison and drove sabre-toothed cats, mammoths and many other large mammals to extinction.
New drug prevents vaginal simian HIV transmission in Monkeys
15 October, 2002
Potentially important insights for understanding vaginal transmission of HIV and designing new HIV prevention strategies may come from a new SHIV study in monkeys.
Researchers clarifies a major uncertainty about bone marrow donor cells.
02 July, 2002
Bone marrow cells have shown a surprising ability to grow in heart, liver, nerve and other cells. These findings have stirred controversy, however, over whether bone marrow cells actually change their genetic program and become these new types of cells. Some researchers have found evidence suggesting that bone marrow cells simply fuse with cells in other organs without actually taking on a new identity.
Book explores how genes and environment influence behavior
25 March, 2002
If your parents are smart, will you be? Can someone be genetically compelled to act rashly? As a relatively new but growing field, behavioral genetics seeks to understand how both genes and environment contribute to the variations in human behavior such as intelligence, lifestyle choices or even proclivity for violence.
New more powerful machines are coming in small packages
10 March, 2002
A new class of micro-gadgets, some no larger than a pencil eraser, are poised to make military and other equipment easier to power and carry. Scientists presented the latest developments from their micro-engineering labs at the 2004 AAAS Annual Meeting.
 
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