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Once called "the first American university" by educational historian Frederick Rudolph, Cornell University represents a distinctive mix of eminent scholarship and democratic ideals. Adding practical subjects to the classics and admitting qualified students regardless of nationality, race, social circumstance, gender, or religion was quite a departure when Cornell was founded in 1865. Today's Cornell reflects this heritage of egalitarian excellence. It is home to the nation's first colleges devoted to hotel administration, industrial and labor relations, and veterinary medicine. Both a private university and the land-grant institution of New York State, Cornell University is the most educationally diverse member of the Ivy League. On the Ithaca campus alone nearly 20,000 students representing every state and 120 countries choose from among 4,000 courses in 11 undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools. Many undergraduates participate in a wide range of interdisciplinary programs, play meaningful roles in original research, and study in Cornell programs in Washington, New York City, and the world over. In his first inaugural address, at the Weill Cornell Medical College campus in Qatar in October 2004, Jeffrey Lehman, the first Cornell alumnus to become its president, articulated a vision projecting Cornell as "the transnational university of the future."


Hierarchical porous polymer film synthesis controls pore sizes
12 August, 2013
Forming perfect porous polymer films is not enough; they need both large and small pores, and the process of making them needs to be simple, versatile and repeatable. Creatively combining already established techniques, Cornell materials researchers have devised a so-called hierarchical porous polymer film synthesis method that may help make these materials useful for applications ranging from catalysis to bioengineering.
Detecting bacteria, viruses & other dangerous substances could soon be as easy as wiping a napkin
04 March, 2007
Detecting bacteria, viruses and other dangerous substances in hospitals, airplanes and other commonly contaminated places could soon be as easy as wiping a napkin or paper towel across a surface, says a researcher from Cornell University.
New gas delivery line to implement its highly efficient, combined heat and power project
03 March, 2007
Cornell University has announced plans for a new gas delivery line to implement its highly efficient, combined heat and power project. This new project will reduce the university's use of coal. And, combined with other efficiency and conservation efforts already in place on campus, it will allow Cornell to meet its goal to reduce carbon dioxide emissions consistent with the Kyoto Protocol.
Exploring the role of environment & community in overweight children
02 March, 2007
The proportion of overweight children in the United States has almost doubled since the mid 1980
Animal Health Diagnostic Center serves as only testing ground for new & deadly dog influenza virus
01 March, 2007
Cornell University's Animal Health Diagnostic Center isolated a new and highly contagious canine influenza virus and serves as the only laboratory currently conducting routine tests for the virus for the general veterinary community.
Looks count: If male barn swallows don't stay spiffy, the females cheat in a jiffy
28 February, 2007
Even after they have paired with a male, the female North American barn swallow still comparison-shops for sexual partners. And forget personality; the females judge males by their looks, the reddish color of the males' breast and belly feathers.
Biofortified, iron-rich rice improves nutrition of women
27 February, 2007
Plant breeding can boost the level of micronutrients in rice and improve the nutritional status of people who eat the grains by as much as 20 percent, according to Cornell University-led research reported in The Journal of Nutrition.
New, faster computer network expands through New York and New England
26 February, 2007
Cornell University is the focal point of a new organization that will enable educational institutions in New York state and New England to connect to and support a new, high-bandwidth computer network.
Glass shapes influence how much we drink: The shorter and wider the glass, the more liquor we pour
25 February, 2007
Contact: Joe Schwartz When pouring liquor, people, including professional bartenders, unintentionally pour 20 to 30 percent more into short, squat glasses than into tall, thin ones, according to a new study at Cornell University.
Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine develops protein tests to accurately detect pet food-poisoned dogs
24 February, 2007
While dogs keep dying from eating pet food tainted with aflatoxin, Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine is announcing it has developed protein tests that accurately indicate a dog's liver failure caused by the toxin.
Cornell central heating plant to become cleaner, more efficient
23 February, 2007
Cornell University announced today its plans to upgrade its central heating plant with a very efficient combined heat-and-power project. This project will use gas turbine technology to cost-effectively reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions, while ensuring the necessary heat and electric capacity for the university's future.
Cornell scientists build 'nano-keys' to bind cell receptors and trigger allergic reactions
22 February, 2007
The tumblers of life continue to click as Cornell University researchers have fabricated a set of 'nano-keys' on the molecular scale to interact with receptors on cell membranes and trigger larger-scale responses within cells, such as the release of histamines in an allergic response.
Reproducing the Amazon's black soil could bolster fertility & remove carbon from atmosphere
21 February, 2007
The search for El Dorado in the Amazonian rainforest might not have yielded pots of gold, but it has led to unearthing a different type of gold mine: some of the globe's richest soil that can transform poor soil into highly fertile ground.
Cornell confirms the First North American case of pig meningitis in humans
20 February, 2007
A seemingly healthy 59-year-old farmer checked into Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, N.Y., complaining of sudden fever and confusion. His pulse was racing, he breathed rapidly, and he had meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord.
Why tipsy flowers don't tip over: Booze stunts stem & leaves, but doesn't affect blossoms, study finds
19 February, 2007
Those paperwhites and other daffodils sure could use a drink, a little whiskey, vodka, gin or tequila could keep them from falling over. A touch of booze is a great way to keep certain houseplants from getting too tall by stunting their growth, according to a new Cornell University study.
Researchers find that racial stereotypes strongly influence sentencing
18 February, 2007
Looks literally can kill in death-penalty cases where jurors decide the fate of a black defendant, particularly if the victim is white, according to a study co-authored by Cornell University Law Professor Sheri Lynn Johnson.
Cornell scientists identify deadly fish virus in the Northeast United States
17 February, 2007
The College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced the discovery of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in several fish species from Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. Unreported in North America until 1988, VHS is a rhabdovirus, a pathogen that can cause significant fish mortality. VHS does not pose any known threat to human health.
Biodegradable napkin, featuring sensitive nanofibers
16 February, 2007
Detecting bacteria, viruses and other dangerous substances in hospitals, airplanes and other commonly contaminated places could soon be as easy as wiping a napkin or paper towel across a surface, says a researcher from Cornell University.
Early childhood TV viewing may trigger autism, data analysis suggests
15 February, 2007
A series of data sets analyzed in a paper by economists at Cornell University and Indiana University-Purdue University suggest a connection between early childhood television viewing and the onset of autism. And the authors urge further investigation and research by experts in the field.
The moon's south pole: Very high resolution, radar images find rocks abundant, but no ice sheets
14 February, 2007
Using the highest resolution radar-signal images ever made of the moon, images from the National Science Foundation's Arecibo Telescope in Arecibo, P.R., and the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Telescope in Green Bank, W.Va., planetary astronomers have found no evidence for ice in craters at the lunar south pole.
Findings stress vital role of Cornell-managed telescope in detecting danger
13 February, 2007
The Arecibo Observatory's powerful radar, a keen eye aimed into the sky, has made the most detailed observations ever of a binary near-Earth asteroid. This information provides clues about asteroid formation, properties and motion dynamics.
New gas delivery line planned for Cornell's combined heat and power project
12 February, 2007
Cornell University has announced plans for a new gas delivery line to implement its highly efficient, combined heat and power project. This new project will reduce the university's use of coal. And, combined with other efficiency and conservation efforts already in place on campus, it will allow Cornell to meet its goal to reduce carbon dioxide emissions consistent with the Kyoto Protocol.
Electronic crystal in high-temperature superconductor
26 August, 2004
With equipment so sensitive that it can locate clusters of electrons, Cornell University and University of Tokyo physicists have - sort of - explained puzzling behaviour in a much-studied high-temperature superconductor, perhaps leading to a better understanding of how such superconductors work.
 
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