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Emory University
1380 Oxford Road
Atlanta
GA 30322
USA
[t] +1 404 712 8780
Emory University is home to nine major academic divisions, numerous centres for advanced study, and a host of prestigious affiliated institutions. In addition to Emory College, the University encompasses a graduate school of arts and sciences; professional schools of medicine, theology, law, nursing, public health, and business; and Oxford College, a two-year undergraduate division on the original campus of Emory in Oxford, Ga.

Emory was founded at Oxford by the Methodist Church in 1836. Led by President James W. Wagner, an award-winning teacher and scholar, the University has 11,300 students and 2,500 faculty members who represent all regions of the United States and more than 100 foreign nations.

Emory University is known for its demanding academics, outstanding undergraduate college of arts and sciences, highly ranked professional schools and state-of-the-art research facilities. For more than a decade Emory has been named one of the country's top 25 national universities by U.S. News & World Report. In addition to its nine schools, the university encompasses The Carter Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center and Emory Healthcare, a comprehensive metropolitan health care system.
Emory researchers study the effects of Zen Meditation on the brain
25 February, 2007
Zen meditation is an ancient spiritual practice that promotes awareness and presence through the undivided engagement of mind and body. For thousands of years, many religious traditions have made meditation a common practice. Now, researchers at Emory University are looking at the effects of Zen meditation and how the brain functions during meditative states.
Yerkes researchers first to discover combination of drug therapies reduces cocaine use
25 February, 2007
Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University are the first to demonstrate a combination of drug therapies targeting the region of the brain that controls drug abuse and addiction significantly reduces cocaine use in nonhuman primates. These findings, which appear in the June issue of the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, have implications for developing treatments for cocaine addiction in humans.
Imaging studies show brain responds to rewards earned The Old-Fashioned Way
25 February, 2007
Human beings are more aroused by rewards they actively earn than by rewards they acquire passively, according to brain imaging research by scientists at Emory University School of Medicine. Results of the study, led by first author Caroline F. Zink and principal investigator Gregory S. Berns, MD, PhD, of Emory's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, are published in the journal Neuron.
Emory Scientists use protein Fingerprints to identify nervous system diseases
25 February, 2007
Scientists from Emory University School of Medicine have used mass spectrometry to identify specific protein fingerprints in human cerebrospinal fluid that differentiate cancers, both primary and metastatic, and non-cancerous diseases of the central nervous system. This finding offers promise of a more rapid, less invasive, and more accurate method of diagnosis of CNS diseases, especially the difficult-to-diagnose CNS cancers, and a better way to monitor disease progression and/or response to therapy.
Primate research combines with eye-tracking technology to detect cognitive impairment
24 February, 2007
Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University have expanded a nonhuman primate-based study to human patients with the intention of identifying human patients with mild cognitive impairment who will progress to the more devastating Alzheimer's disease. MCI is a subtle memory impairment without dementia. The goal of such identification is to develop early interventional therapy to stop or slow the progression of MCI to AD.
Researchers find that gastric bypass reduces hunger hormone
24 February, 2007
Appetite enhancing hormones called ghrelin are significantly reduced in severely obese patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery, according to Emory researchers. The decrease in ghrelin may explain the loss of hunger sensations and rapid weight loss in these patients.
Emory pioneers robotic system for precision radiation treatments
24 February, 2007
Emory University School of Medicine's Department of Radiation Oncology has become the first health care facility in the U.S. to deliver new ultra-precise radiotherapy treatments using a fully robotic on-board imaging system for tracking tumor locations and positioning patients. Emory clinicians report that they have treated seven patients with image-guided radiation therapy using a newly developed On-Board Imager and Clinac linear accelerator from Varian Medical Systems.
Synthetic hormone used in contraceptives & HRT produces negative effects In monkey studies
24 February, 2007
Medroxyprogesterone acetate, a synthetic form of the naturally occurring steroid hormone progesterone widely used in contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, increases aggression and anxiety and reduces sexual activity in female monkeys, according to a study published in the June edition of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.
Researchers test magnetic stimulation as treatment for major depression
23 February, 2007
Are brief but intense magnetic pulses delivered to the brain more effective than placebo in treating patients who suffer from depression? A new research study at Emory University and 15 other sites across the U.S. will test the effects of a non-drug therapy called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or simply TMS), to determine the effectiveness of this investigational treatment in improving mood.
Researchers test deep-brain stimulation to reduce epileptic seizures
23 February, 2007
In the first U.S. clinical trial of its kind, deep-brain stimulation therapy, a treatment that has proven effective for other neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, is being tested on patients with epilepsy to determine if it can help reduce the frequency of seizures.
Emory Scientists target tumors with nanoparticle Quantum Dots
23 February, 2007
Emory University scientists have for the first time used a new class of luminescent 'quantum dot' nanoparticles in living animals to simultaneously target and image cancerous tumors. The quantum dots were encapsulated in a highly protective polymer coating and attached to a monoclonal antibody that guided them to prostate tumor sites in living mice, where they were visible using a simple mercury lamp.
Research clarifies role of LR11 receptor in Alzheimer's Disease
23 February, 2007
Emory University scientists are using a combination of transgenic mouse models and viral vectors to clarify the role of a brain molecule called LR11 in Alzheimer's disease. LR11 is a receptor for apolipoprotein E, which is involved in cholesterol metabolism and has previously been linked to AD. Early studies suggest that LR11 regulates levels of beta amyloid, which is the primary protein comprising the senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.
Tuberculosis drug combined with virtual reality therapy is effective in treating fear
22 February, 2007
A tuberculosis drug called D-cycloserine, used in concert with psychotherapy, is an effective treatment for some anxiety-related disorders, according to research by scientists at Emory University School of Medicine and the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. The study was led by Michael Davis, PhD, Kerry Ressler, MD, PhD, and Barbara Rothbaum, PhD, of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and is reported in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.
Bladder Pacemaker to improve quality of life for incontinence patients
22 February, 2007
Apprehension about long road trips and four restroom visits during the night had become the norm for Juanita Bowman. Compared to a person with a normal bladder who uses the restroom four to seven times per day, a cup of water could send her to the restroom up to three times in an hour and a half. But after an alternative procedure for overactive bladder that Bowman, age 69, received at Emory Hospitals, her leaking episodes have been completely eliminated.
Emory offers new targeted radiation treatment for brain tumors with first machine of its kind
22 February, 2007
Emory University's Winship Cancer Institute is the first site in the world to offer a new, extremely precise, image-guided radiation treatment system for brain tumors, offering patients an alternative to surgical removal of tumors. The Trilogy system, created by Varian Medical Systems, delivers higher doses of targeted radiation to smaller areas with more precision over a shorter period of time. It allows doctors to customize the treatment plan for each patient.
New class of drugs being tested as alternative for AIDS patients with resistant virus
22 February, 2007
A new class of AIDS drugs that inhibit the HIV virus from entering and infecting cells may be effective in AIDS patients infected with resistant forms of virus that do not respond to commonly used multi-drug combinations of antiretroviral therapy.
Celebrex promotes anti-cancer activity in cells
21 February, 2007
Celebrex, a popular pain-reliever, may also serve as an effective anti-cancer drug. Shi-Yong Sun, PhD, assistant professor at Emory University's Winship Cancer Institute, has published a paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that outlines how Celebrex can induce cell-death, in lung cancer cells. The paper is published in the December 1 issue of JNCI.
Patients benefit from the strongest hospital-based MRI in Georgia at Emory
21 February, 2007
Patients at Emory University Hospital have access to the strongest MRI available in Georgia, which means doctors have a clearer image for increased diagnostic accuracy.
New study shows statins offer significant benefits for heart failure patients
21 February, 2007
Cholesterol lowering drugs known as statins have become a mainstay in the fight against coronary artery disease and are routinely prescribed for people at risk for cardiovascular disease because of hypercholesterolemia. Emory research presented here today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions indicates statins can help heart failure patients in additional ways, whether or not their condition was caused by CAD.
Emory researchers find Cilostazol may prevent restenosis in Diabetics after stenting
21 February, 2007
During angioplasty, the most commonly used procedure in the U.S. to treat potentially life-threatening coronary blockages, a balloon- tipped catheter pushes aside atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Once the vessel has been widened and adequate blood flow is returned, stents (tiny mesh wire tubes) are frequently used to keep arteries open. However, renarrowing has proved to be a frequent problem following angioplasty, especially in diabetic patients.
Emory Interventional Radiologists use laser treatment to zap Varicose Veins
20 February, 2007
Pain and discomfort are just two of the common complaints of having varicose veins. Many describe their unattractive legs as the biggest downside of the condition. Now a new laser procedure at Emory University is removing those painful and ugly veins without surgery.
Emory Eye Center offers new vision correction procedure for Severe Myopia
20 February, 2007
For those people who have dealt with severe degrees of myopia yet have not been good candidates for surgeries such as LASIK, a new implant may provide them new hope, and new vision.
Mutations in Mitochondrial DNA play significant role in Prostate Cancer
20 February, 2007
Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play an important role in the development of prostate cancer, according to research by scientists at Emory University School of Medicine and the University of California, Irvine. The findings are published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Researchers say virtual reality training is wave of the future for Cardiovascular Medicine
20 February, 2007
Historically, physicians have learned new procedures by first practicing on animals, cadavers or mechanical models, eventually receiving 'on-the-job training' by operating on patients under the guidance of experienced teachers. However, in a commentary published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Emory Heart Center cardiologist Christopher Cates, MD, and Anthony Gallagher, PhD, Experimental Psychologist for the Division of Cardiology at Emory University Hospital, say this paradigm needs to change, especially in the field of cardiovascular medicine.
Emory researchers find three anti-platelet drugs used in combination are safe
19 February, 2007
Three drugs, each of which works in a different way, are used in anti-platelet therapy to help prevent restenosis (the reclogging of blood vessels after they have been cleared with percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI) or thrombosis (obstruction of an artery or vein by a blood clot). The use of these platelet inhibitory drugs, cilostazol, clopidogrel and aspirin, has resulted in a significant reduction of thrombotic complications in the primary and secondary prevention of heart attacks. But is it safe to use these medications together, or in combination do they increase the risk of bleeding? And will patients comply with taking three pills?
Study says rare allergic reactions to drug-eluting stents may raise risk for heart attack
19 February, 2007
Stents, tiny wire mesh tubes, are routinely used to prop arteries open after angioplasty clears them of potentially heart attack causing plaque. In the past, stented arteries often eventually closed up again with fatty deposits, a process called restenosis. However, since their FDA approval, stents coated with sirolimus (a pharmaceutical agent that prevents excess tissue growth) have been shown to greatly reduce restenosis. But some people suffer from rare, allergic-type reactions to the sirolimus-eluting stents.
Deep brain stimulation may be an effective treatment for treatment-resistant depression
19 February, 2007
A study published in Neuron reports evidence that Deep Brain Stimulation could have clinical benefits for individuals suffering from severe depression who have failed other treatments. The University of Toronto study, led by Helen S. Mayberg, MD, now a professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Neurology at Emory University School of Medicine, opens a promising line of research for depressed patients who do not respond to other therapies.
Transplant drug effectively preserves kidneys while avoiding toxic side effects
19 February, 2007
Physician-researchers at Emory University in Atlanta have shown an investigational medication, known as LEA29Y (belatacept), is effective in preserving transplanted kidney function while at the same time avoiding the toxic side effects that are common in the currently used long-term, immunosuppressive transplant medications.
Heart failure drug prolongs life and is cost-effective
19 February, 2007
Drug therapy, even when safe and effective for serious health problems, can have a downside, a hefty price tag. But there's good news for people suffering from left ventricular systolic dysfunction and congestive heart failure following a heart attack. A study published today in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, concludes the drug eplerenone can not only help many of these people live longer, it is also remarkably cost effective, according to lead author William S. Weintraub, MD, of the Emory Heart Center.
Sex hormone metabolite reduces stress, anxiety in female rats
19 February, 2007
A steroid hormone released during the metabolism of progesterone, the female sex hormone, reduces the brain's response to stress, according to research in rats by scientists at Emory University School of Medicine, the Yerkes National Primate Research Center and Atlanta's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. The scientists found evidence that the progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone reduces the brain's response to corticotropin-releasing factor, a peptide hormone that plays an important role in the stress response in animals.
New drug available for treatment of Wet Macular Degeneration Disease
19 February, 2007
A new drug for treatment of the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, known as AMD, has been approved by the FDA recently. AMD is a serious disease of the retina that can lead to severe vision loss and blindness.
Study finds Cilostazol lowers restenosis rate in kidney disease patients after angioplasty
18 February, 2007
According to the National Kidney Foundation, more than 20 million Americans (one in nine adults) have chronic kidney disease. Many of these people also have heart disease and undergo percutaneous coronary intervention, in which angioplasty and stenting are employed to widen narrowed blood vessels. CKD places these patients at increased risk for restenosis, the renarrowing of blood vessels after PCI.
Emory study finds HIV is not an independent risk factor for severe heart disease
18 February, 2007
Infection with human immunodeficiency virus is no longer an automatic death sentence, thanks to the use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. However, several studies questions have suggested that HIV infection poses a serious threat to the heart , specifically, that HIV positivity leads to an increased risk for the development of angiographically severe coronary artery disease.
Study shows heart patients' quality of life dependent on degree of depression
18 February, 2007
According to the National Institutes for Mental Health, research over the past two decades has shown that people with heart disease are more likely to suffer from depression than otherwise healthy people. In addition, people with depression are at greater risk for developing heart disease.
Study finds drug eluting stents as effective as vascular brachytherapy
18 February, 2007
After angioplasty is performed to widen clogged arteries, surgeons frequently use tiny wire-mesh tubes called stents to keep blood vessels open. But despite stenting, scar tissue can form to create new blockages, a process called in-stent restenosis. At present, vascular brachytherapy (catheter-based delivery of intracoronary radiation) is the only therapeutic modality proven to effectively reduce in-stent restenosis.
Genetic amplification test detects HIV more effectively than standard tests
18 February, 2007
Adding a new HIV screening method, called nucleic acid amplification testing, to standard HIV testing, researchers were able to uncover six percent more cases of HIV infection in urban STD and drug treatment clinics and HIV testing sites in Atlanta than with standard HIV antibody tests alone. The research was presented at the 12th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston on February 25 by Frances Priddy, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.
National study recommends Aspirin over common anti-clotting drug to prevent stroke
17 February, 2007
Patients at risk of developing a stroke caused by narrowed brain arteries should take aspirin rather than a well-known anti-clotting medication to prevent a stroke from occurring, according to the results of a major national study led by researchers in the Emory University Schools of Medicine and Public Health and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Study shows Bivalirudin lowers risk of blood transfusion in coronary procedures
17 February, 2007
Research presented this week at the Cardiovascular Revascularization Therapies 2005 conference in Washington, DC concludes that for patients receiving a coronary stent or angioplasty procedure, the risk of needing a blood transfusion is 32 percent lower with the use of the antithrombotic drug bivalirudin, when compared to the combination of heparin and a glycoprotetin inhibitor.
Emory scientists find new prostate cancer suppressor gene
17 February, 2007
A gene named ATBF1 may contribute to the development of prostate cancer through acquired mutations and/or loss of expression, according to research at Emory University School of Medicine and its Winship Cancer Institute. The findings were published in the online edition of Nature Genetics. The Emory research team was led by Jin-Tang Dong, PhD, associate professor in the Winship Cancer Institute. Lead author was postdoctoral fellow Xiaodong Sun, PhD.
Invasive pneumonia propped following introduction of childhood vaccine
17 February, 2007
The problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major cause of pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis, was dramatically reversed following the licensing and use of a new conjugate vaccine for young children in February 2000, according to research conducted at Emory University, the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Georgia Division of Public Health.
Inherited variations in Mitochondrial DNA linked to renal and prostate cancer
16 February, 2007
More than 20 million men in the United States with a particular signature set of inherited characteristics and mutations in mitochondrial DNA are at significantly increased risk for developing renal and prostate cancers, according to research at Emory University.
National study shows older children can benefit from treatments for common eye disorder
16 February, 2007
Surprising results from a nationwide clinical trial conducted at Emory and 48 other eye centers show that many children aged seven through 17 with amblyopia (lazy eye) may benefit from treatments that are more commonly used on younger children.
Breast cancer drug Tamoxifen increases anxiety behaviors in female nonhuman primates
16 February, 2007
Tamoxifen, the most widely prescribed drug for treating and preventing breast cancer in women, increases anxiety behaviors in female rhesus macaques, according to a study conducted at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University by Yerkes, Emory and Atlanta-based Center for Behavioral Neuroscience researchers.
Emory participates in study using wireless sensor implants to monitor aneurysm leaks
16 February, 2007
James Watson was a walking time bomb and didn't know it. During a CT scan performed for abdominal pain, Emory doctors discovered an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Now Watson has an implanted wireless microchip sensor designed to detect endoleaks with the potential to cause a fatal rupture.
New England journal reports breakthrough in Myeloma treatment
15 February, 2007
A major breakthrough in multiple myeloma treatment is reported in this week's New England Journal of Medicine. Sagar Lonial, MD, assistant professor of hematology and oncology at Emory's Winship Cancer Institute, is one of the authors of the paper, 'Bortezomib or High Dose Dexamethasone for Relapsed Multiple Myeloma.'
Social behavior may be shaped by differences in the length of seemingly non-functional DNA
15 February, 2007
Why are some people shy while others are outgoing? A study in the current issue of Science demonstrates for the first time that social behavior may be shaped by differences in the length of seemingly non-functional DNA, sometimes referred to as junk DNA. The finding by researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University and the Atlanta-based Center for Behavioral Neuroscience has implications for understanding human social behavior and disorders, such as autism.
Elevated Potassium can produce pseudo heart attack
15 February, 2007
When a man appeared in the Emory Hospital Emergency Department with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain that had persisted for eight hours, an electrocardiogram was performed. The test revealed an elevated ST-segment, the tell-tale sign of a major heart attack (also called a myocardial infarction, or MI).
New device developed by Georgia Tech and Emory checks for concussions on the sidelines
15 February, 2007
A player just took a hard knock to the head and is lying on the field. A coach rushes to his side, but the player sits up and seems fine. He knows who the president is and how many fingers the coach is holding up. But is he ready to get back in the game?
Anti-cancer drug, Gleevec, may be effective against Smallpox
14 February, 2007
The hallmark anti-cancer drug Gleevec may be effective in controlling smallpox infections or treating the complications caused by smallpox vaccinations, according to research at Emory University. Gleevec has been highly successful in treating chronic myelogenous leukemia in humans and has few adverse side effects.
Emory study shows obesity causing dramatic increase in insurance cost
14 February, 2007
The obesity epidemic has caused a tenfold increase in the nation's private health insurance bill for conditions related to being overweight, according to a self-funded study by researchers with the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health published today in the online version of the journal Health Affairs. According to the study the cost of treating conditions linked to obesity increased from $3.6 billion to $36.5 billion between 1987 and 2002. The study concludes that the best way to lower healthcare spending is to target the rise in population risk factors, especially obesity.
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