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Society for General Microbiology
Marlborough House
Basingstoke Road, Spencers Wood
Reading
RG7 1AG
UK
[t] +44 118 988 1843
[f] +44 (0) 118 988 5656
The Society for General Microbiology is the largest microbiology society in Europe, and has over 5,500 members worldwide. The Society provides a common meeting ground for scientists working in research and in fields with applications in microbiology including medicine, veterinary medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry, agriculture, food, the environment and education.

The SGM represents the science and profession of microbiology to government, the media and the general public; supporting microbiology education at all levels; and encouraging careers in microbiology.
Hope of effective vaccines for devastating diseases after new work on artificially constructed viruses
17 June, 2007
According to researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in work presented at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh, new work on artificially constructed viruses offers the hope of effective vaccines for devastating diseases in the future.
16 June, 2007
According to research due to be presented at a Society for General Microbiology meeting at UMIST in Manchester, potato blight causes worldwide losses of
Silver medal for SGM at Chelsea Flower Show
15 June, 2007
At the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, gardening enthusiasts were keen to learn how some microbes can harm their garden plants. The Society for General Microbiology
New technology to see ever smaller and smaller pieces of the puzzle that is life
14 June, 2007
The Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology, looks at vital role that microscopy plays to advance our understanding of the lives of some fascinating micro-organisms.
A simple blood test for tuberculosis in children could reduce deaths
13 June, 2007
TB testing in children is crucial as the disease can rapidly spread from the lungs to other organs, such as the brain, spine and kidneys, leading to life threatening conditions which particularly affect children. A simple blood test to analyse and identify proteins circulating in the blood of infected children could provide the answer.
Cystitis and other infections possibly caused by bacteria using a rudimentary form of computing power to co-ordinate their attacks
12 June, 2007
According to scientists, cystitis and the other urinary tract infections suffered by one in five women may be caused by bacteria using a rudimentary form of computing power to co-ordinate their attacks and act as a genetic memory.
Parasites causing African sleeping sickness constantly change their coats for disguise
11 June, 2007
Scientists heard at the Society for General Microbiology
Research suggests spreading of sewage sludge on fields poses practically no risk
10 June, 2007
Society for General Microbiology researchers say food poisoning bugs in sewage sludge which is spread on fields are destroyed so quickly that they pose practically no risk.
Why antibiotic resistant superbugs win out in the wild
09 June, 2007
Researchers have discovered why superbugs like MRSA are dominating our hospitals, when accepted wisdom says that the cost for bacteria of competing against non-resistant strains should be too great in most circumstances.
Breakthrough in production of biofuels
08 June, 2007
Scientists in Germany have developed a breakthrough in the production of biofuels. Research published in the Microbiology, a Society for General Microbiology journal, describes how specially engineered bacteria could be used to make fuel completely from food crops.
A breakthrough in classification of new bacteria
07 June, 2007
An article in Microbiology Today reports that classifications of new bacteria have been made easier after a study found that
Bird 'flu (H5N1) - What happens if the critical care system is overwhelmed?
06 June, 2007
The Federation of Infection Societies conference heard that plans to make fair decisions about who gets scarce treatment if bird
Global consequences for HIV and drug resistant tuberculosis in Africa
05 June, 2007
Africa has 10% of the worldwide population but is also home 70% of the world
New challenge for combating Syphilis as it resurfaces in London
04 June, 2007
The Federation of Infection Societies conference in Cardiff heard that cases of Syphilis are on the rise in Britain, putting infants at risk of dying by having the disease passed on by their mothers during pregnancy.
Serious multi-drug-resistant bacteria are also becoming immune to hospital disinfectants & antiseptics
03 June, 2007
New research presented by the Society for General Microbiology, suggests that dangerous multi-drug-resistant bacteria are also developing immunity to hospital disinfectants and antiseptics.
The ability of viruses to infect & destroy cells is being used by scientists to stop cancerous tumours
02 June, 2007
An article in the Microbiology (The Society for General Microbiology's quarterly magazine) states that the natural ability of viruses to infect and destroy cells is being used by scientists to kill cancerous tumours.
Hospital stitching, nylon strips, beads & thread covered in viruses could be effective against MRSA
01 June, 2007
Beads, nylon strips and hospital stitching thread covered in viruses might prove to be an effective weapon against the hospital acquired superbug MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), according to research.
Herpes hope for new brain tumour treatment
18 June, 2006
A virus that causes brain infections is now being tamed to treat brain tumours, scientists heard at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Evidence that some cleaning agents may actually help bacteria to survive in hospitals
18 June, 2006
Elderly patients, who are most at risk from hospital bugs which cause diarrhoea, could be having their health endangered by the widespread use of some disinfectants, according to scientists presenting research at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Hope that MRSA spread can be beaten by vaccination
17 June, 2006
Superbugs stuck in the noses of patients, visitors and staff could be causing the spread of the feared multiple antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA in hospitals, scientists heard at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Strawberry and chocolate danger could be prevented by good bacteria
16 June, 2006
Consuming strawberries, chocolate and tea in excess can all lead to kidney stones, but the danger might be prevented by probiotics, according to medical researchers speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Making better probiotics, a helping hand for friendly bacteria
16 June, 2006
Asthma, eczema, bowel disease and other medical problems, which can be helped by taking probiotics, foods containing friendly bacteria, may be improved even further according to research announced at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Antibiotics increase tuberculosis resistance risk
15 June, 2006
Drug resistant tuberculosis may be on the increase due to a limited repertoire of effective drugs, which need to be given in combination, and the inability of some TB bacteria to repair their own DNA properly, leading to faster mutations, according to scientists presenting their research at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Pandemic potential of H5N1 bird 'flu
15 June, 2006
Making vaccines against bird 'flu is difficult and many problems need to be overcome before production begins of a vaccine for the disease, according to an article in the issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology.
Carbon kick start works wonders for plant growth
14 June, 2006
Feeding the bugs lurking in potting compost or soil some extra carbon rations to kick start their activity can boost healthy crop growth in an environmentally friendly way, biologists heard at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Bacteria as logic boxes, decision making switches may hold key to combat drug resistance
14 June, 2006
Bacteria are very capable of making decisions that require juggling various aspects of life, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Marine bacteria are cutting cooling gas emissions
13 June, 2006
Marine bacteria are reducing the amount of an important climate cooling gas given off from our seas and studies on enzymes from a model bacterium could help to understand this important process, say scientists at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
New infrared snapshot will spot contaminated meat in seconds and prevent food poisoning
13 June, 2006
A new technique to spot contaminated meat in seconds instead of the hours currently needed could revolutionise the food processing industry and prevent thousands of cases of food poisoning every year, according to scientists speaking today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Trojan horses may hold key to Campylobacter in chicken farms
12 June, 2006
An extremely unpleasant food poisoning bug, often caught through eating undercooked chicken, is lurking in Trojan horses on our farms, according to scientists presenting at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Tuberculosis treatment from fat buster drugs
12 June, 2006
Tuberculosis is returning to haunt the UK and Europe as the bacterium that causes it becomes resistant to more and more of the drugs doctors use to treat it. Now researchers have found a potential new target for treatments in fatty molecules attached to the microbe's cell walls, the Society for General Microbiology heard today at its 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Chlamydia could cause chronic heart disease
04 April, 2006
A common bacterium best known for sore throats and bronchitis may play a role in heart disease and strokes, according to detective work by Washington-based pathobiologists announced at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Aspirin agent aids plants against virus
29 March, 2006
Yet another extraordinary ability of the active ingredient in aspirin, salicylic acid, has just been identified by plant scientists working at the University of Cambridge, researchers heard at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
Microbes on the move, Microbiology Today: November 2005 issue
03 November, 2005
Clouds of desert dust are moving vast numbers of microbes around the globe, which can be harmful or beneficial to downwind communities, according to an article in the November 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology.
Bird 'flu: not the only flying hazard, Microbiology Today: November 2005 issue
03 November, 2005
Our view of wild birds is mostly positive. They are a lovely sight as they soar through the air or drift lazily on updrafts. But there is a downside to this beauty. Birds are reservoirs for all manner of infectious disease and we can do little about it, according to an article in the November 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology.
Preserving food by stopping bacteria blabbering
14 September, 2005
Understanding the language that bacteria use to communicate with each other may lead to new food preservation methods, according to Danish scientists at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
What lies beneath? Life deep underground offers nuclear safety
13 September, 2005
Microbes may assist the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel deep underground for a hundred thousand years, according to Swedish scientists speaking today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK
New metal munching microbes, bug batteries and automatic miners
13 September, 2005
Electricity generated by bugs living deep in metal rich mud, cleaning up contaminated land, and mining metals automatically using microbes are just some of the most likely possibilities for the future, according to research discussed at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Vaccine for typhoid and food poisoning possible, after scientists decode structure of proteins and stomach sugars
13 September, 2005
Scientists have identified a key molecule used by Salmonella food poisoning bacteria to break into our gut walls, leading to hope for a vaccine, in research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Methane eating undersea bugs prevent greenhouse gases getting out
13 September, 2005
13 September 2005 Methane eating undersea bugs prevent greenhouse gases getting out Scientists have discovered how microbes in the sea play a crucial part in preventing huge quantities of the greenhouse gas methane from reaching the atmosphere, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK. Methane is not just produced in rubbish tips, it also comes in huge quantities from decomposing seaweeds and tiny creatures which fall to the seabed. But other micro-organisms manage to consume more than 80% of the methane before it can bubble up through the seawater and reach the atmosphere, causing massive global warming. 'Scientists are just beginning to understand the importance of these marine ecosystems, which work without any oxygen,' says Dr Martin Kr
Fungi can help plants cope with toxic metals in the soil and clean up pollution say scientists
13 September, 2005
Friendly fungi living on the roots of plants can help them find nutrients for themselves and the plants, deal with toxic metals in the soil, and help clean up contaminated sites according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
GBS vaccine hope for newborn babies
13 September, 2005
Group B Streptococcusare the most common bacteria attacking newborn babies, affecting 1 in 1000 births, and killing up to 6% of those infected. Now microbiologists may be closer to finding a way of protecting against them, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Wilting threat to commercial glasshouse tomato crop
12 September, 2005
Commercial tomatoes have been bred to resist Verticillium wilt, but new strains of the fungus have appeared, attacking glasshouse crops in Britain and the Netherlands. Now scientists are fighting back using DNA forensics, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
Cot death clues from superbug survival strategy
12 September, 2005
Bacteria linked to cot death could be surviving in babies' mattresses, particularly in damp conditions, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK. Scientists from Leicester found that of the bacteria studied, a common bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus, closely related to the hospital superbug, was the most successful at surviving for long periods in infant cots.
Gum disease
12 September, 2005
Gum diseases caused by bacteria that can survive in the harsh environment of the human mouth may be preventable in future, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK. 'The NHS already spends
Killer into cure - using viruses to treat cancer
29 July, 2005
The natural ability of viruses to infect and destroy cells is being used by scientists to kill cancerous tumours, according to an article in the August 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. Professor Moira Brown of Southern General Hospital in Glasgow explains how viruses that cause common diseases, such as cold sores and 'flu, have been modified so that they are no longer harmful, but can target and kill only cancerous cells.
Home composting could cut down greenhouse gas
05 May, 2005
Composting household organic waste not only reduces landfill disposal, but could also help to cut greenhouse gases according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. The UK currently dumps about 85% of its domestic waste straight into landfill and much of this is biodegradable. Anaerobic microbial decomposition of organic waste in landfills generates methane, a principal greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.
Home composting could cut down greenhouse gas - Microbiology Today: May 2005 issue
05 May, 2005
Composting household organic waste not only reduces landfill disposal, but could also help to cut greenhouse gases according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. The UK currently dumps about 85% of its domestic waste straight into landfill and much of this is biodegradable. Anaerobic microbial decomposition of organic waste in landfills generates methane, a principal greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.
Barbecue food risks blamed on global warming
05 May, 2005
Global warming holds an additional risk to the people of Britain, according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. Rises in temperature and longer days mean that more of us will be tempted by the lure of the barbecue, which could be followed by an unwelcome dose of food poisoning. Already, at the first sign of sun, people dust down the grill and head outside to cook.
Chemically-conscious gardeners use bugs to beat back the weeds
05 May, 2005
Organic gardeners can control pesky weeds with the help of some common soil microbes, according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. As Robert J Kremer of the University of Missouri explains, soil that suppresses the growth of weeds isn't science fiction and doesn't involve chemical fertilisers and herbicides.
Phosphates through fungi could reduce fertiliser use
05 May, 2005
Scientists are looking to a little known, but very widespread, phenomenon to provide a natural source of fertilisers for plants and crops, according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. 'Remarkably, most plants are not just plants; they are symbioses with fungi,' explains Professor Alastair Fitter, from the University of York. Professor Fitter is studying this marvellous alliance of plant roots and fungi, called a mycorrhiza, to find out how they work together to survive.
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