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Stanford University
450 Serra Mall
Stanford
CA-94305
USA
[t] +1 650 723-2300
[W] http://www.stanford.edu


Located between San Francisco and San Jose in the heart of Silicon Valley, Stanford University is recognized as one of the world's leading research and teaching institutions.



The Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) is a joint institute of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. SIMES studies the nature, properties and synthesis of complex and novel materials in the effort to create clean, renewable energy technologies.


 


SLAC is a multi-program laboratory exploring frontier questions in photon science, astrophysics, particle physics and accelerator research. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy Office of Science.


 


Stanene could replace graphene with 100% electrical conductivity
10 January, 2014
Even copper's high electrical conductivity is beginning to hold back computers as scientists push the material to its limits. Now, a new material made from a single layer of tin atoms could make history by becoming the world’s first electrical conductor to work at 100% efficiency. This would make it even more conductive than graphene.
Self-healing stretchy polymer heals battery electrode cracks
02 December, 2013
A battery electrode that heals itself open a potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices. A stretchy polymer coats the electrode, binds it together and spontaneously heals tiny cracks that develop during battery operation.
Electrical and mechanical self-healing composite targets electronic skin applications
16 November, 2012
Researchers at Stanford University have created a new flexible skin-like material that has the ability to heal itself, which could pave the way for a new generation of prosthetics. Further development could also lead to regeneration of organs and limitless other possibilities.
 
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