Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
Company Directory
Yale University
New Haven
[t] +1 203 432 1326
Yale University comprises three major academic components: Yale College (the undergraduate program), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and ten professional schools. In addition, Yale encompasses a wide array of research organizations, libraries and museums, and administrative and support offices. Approximately 11,250 students attend Yale.
Ultrasound affects embryonic mouse brain development
08 April, 2007
The prolonged and frequent use of ultrasound on pregnant mice causes brain abnormalities in the developing mouse fetus, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Anxiety before surgery complicates recovery in children
07 April, 2007
Children who are anxious before surgery experience a more painful, slow, and complicated postoperative recovery, according to a Yale School of Medicine study published this month in Pediatrics.
Study suggests molecular basis for urge to smoke
06 April, 2007
When cigarette smokers first stop smoking the number of nicotine receptors in the brain is significantly higher when compared to non-smokers, which may explain why it is so tough to quit, according to a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience.
Bathing disability in elderly strong predictor of long-term admission to nursing homes
05 April, 2007
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that persistent bathing disability among the elderly can increase the risk of long-term nursing home admission by 77 percent, but interventions aimed at prevention and remediation could reduce the need for these long-term care services.
Wasabi's kick linked to single pain receptor
05 April, 2007
A single pain receptor is responsible for the kick delivered by garlic and mustard oil, which is the active ingredient in mustard and in the pungent green sushi condiment known as wasabi, according to a Yale School of Medicine study published this week in Cell.
Racial achievement gap dramatically altered with affirmation exercise
04 April, 2007
For minority students, simply completing a writing assignment designed to affirm a positive identity and sense of
Too much or too little Sseep increases diabetes risk
04 April, 2007
Men who sleep too much or too little are at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a study by the New England Research Institutes in collaboration with Yale School of Medicine researchers.
Yale technology spins out varicose vein device company
03 April, 2007
A new company, Vascular Insights, LLC, was founded to develop, manufacture and market devices to treat varicose vein disease, based on technology invented by Michael Tal, M.D., assistant professor of diagnostic radiology and director of research interventional radiology at Yale University School of Medicine.
Cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce mortality during stroke
03 April, 2007
Patients given lipid lowering agents during an ischemic stroke have a considerably higher survival rate than patients who do not use the cholesterol-reducing drugs, according to recent research by Yale School of Medicine investigators.
Targeted drug delivery now possible with pHLIP peptide
02 April, 2007
Scientists at Yale and the University of Rhode Island report the development of a peptide that can specifically and directly deliver molecules to the inside of cells like a nanosyringe, creating a new tool for drug delivery, gene control and imaging of diseased tissues.
Potential vaccine could slow growth of cervical cancer
02 April, 2007
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have made promising advances in finding a vaccine for women infected with human papilloma virus, which is known to cause cervical cancer.
Foods and vitamins rich in antioxidants do not reduce prostate cancer risk
01 April, 2007
Men who consume foods and vitamins high in vitamin E, Beta-carotene and vitamin C do not lower their risk of prostate cancer, Yale School of Medicine researchers report recently in the Journal of National Cancer Institute.
North Pole
31 March, 2007
Detailed information on greenhouse gasses and a subtropical heat wave at the North Pole 55 million years ago is providing information about the Earth
Drug may help weight-concerned smokers trying to quit
31 March, 2007
The drug naltrexone might help reduce weight gain in smokers as they try to quit, according to a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published this week in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
Evidence for ultra-energetic particles in jet from black hole
30 March, 2007
An international team of astronomers led by researchers at Yale has obtained key infrared observations that reveal the nature of quasar particle jets that originate just outside super-massive black holes at the center of galaxies and radiate across the spectrum from radio to X-ray wavelengths; a complementary study of jet X-ray emission led by astronomers at the University of Southampton, reaches the same conclusion.
Minimal cocktail for growing human embryonic stem cells established
30 March, 2007
Researchers at Yale have established the minimal nutritional requirements for growing and maintaining human embryonic stem cells, a recipe that is critical for clinical application and for developmental studies, according to an early online report this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Power plants are major influence in regional mercury emissions
29 March, 2007
The amount of mercury emitted into the atmosphere in the Northeast fluctuates annually depending on activity in the electric power industry, according to researchers at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.
Brain compensates for aging by becoming less Specialized
29 March, 2007
One of two separate areas of the brain light up when younger people look at a house or a face, but each image activates both areas of the brain at the same time in older persons, according to a study published by Yale University and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, this month in NeuroReport.
Making a Face: A new and earlier marker of neural crest development
28 March, 2007
The fate of cells that go on to form the face, skull and nerve centers of the head and neck in vertebrates is determined much earlier in development than previously thought, and is independent of interaction with other forming tissues, according to a recent study published in the journal Nature.
Conscious and unconscious memory linked in storing new information
28 March, 2007
The way the brain stores new, conscious information such as a first kiss or a childhood home is strongly linked to the way the human brain stores unconscious information, researchers at Yale report this month in an article featured on the cover of Neuron.
Adult male circumcision could reduce the HIV epidemic in Africa
27 March, 2007
Even modest programs advocating adult male circumcision can substantially prevent HIV infections and should be implemented immediately, researchers at Yale School of Medicine reported recently at the 16th International AIDS Conference in Toronto.
Large family study pinpoints genetic linkage in drug addiction
27 March, 2007
Based on data obtained from one of the largest family sets of its kind, Yale School of Medicine researchers have identified a genetic linkage for dependence on drugs such as heroin, morphine and oxycontin.
Controlling behavior of children with tourette and tic disorders
26 March, 2007
A program to train parents how to manage the disruptive behavior of children with Tourette syndrome and tic disorders works well, according to a pilot study conducted by Yale School of Nursing and the Yale Child Study Center.
Brain communicates in analog and digital modes simultaneously
26 March, 2007
Contrary to popular belief, brain cells use a mix of analog and digital coding at the same time to communicate efficiently, according to a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published this week in Nature.
Bacterial protein shows promise for treating intestinal parasites
25 March, 2007
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego and Yale University have discovered that a natural protein produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, the bacterium sprayed on crops by organic farmers to reduce insect damage, is highly effective at treating hookworm infections in laboratory animals.
Yale researchers find environmental toxins disruptive to hearing in mammals
25 March, 2007
Yale School of Medicine researchers have new data showing chloride ions are critical to hearing in mammals, which builds on previous research showing a chemical used to keep barnacles off boats might disrupt the balance of these ions in ear cells.
Leptin has powerful effect on reward center in the brain
24 March, 2007
Leptin, a hormone critical for normal food intake and metabolism, exerts a strong effect on appetite by acting in the mid-brain region as well as in the hypothalamus, according to a Yale School of Medicine study in Neuron.
Osteoporosis drug as effective as Tamoxifen in preventing invasive breast cancer
24 March, 2007
Initial results of the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, in which Yale Cancer Center participated, show that the drug raloxifene, currently used to prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, works as well as tamoxifen in reducing breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women at increased risk of the disease.
Two proteins have unexpected effects on autoimmune diseases such as lupus
23 March, 2007
Blocking the effect of individual immune system proteins that normally recognize viruses and bacteria produces surprisingly different effects on the severity of autoimmune diseases such as Lupus, researchers at Yale School of Medicine report in the September issue of Immunity. Drugs that target these proteins could be important therapies for autoimmunity.
Telemonitoring to reduce hospitalizations among heart failure patients
23 March, 2007
In NIH-sponsored study to determine whether a system of monitoring symptoms and weight by telephone can reduce hospitalizations in heart failure patients, is being launched at Yale School of Medicine.
New biomarker predicts survival in colorectal cancer
22 March, 2007
The location and amount of a protein within two separate compartments of a tumor cell may be critical markers predicting survival in colorectal cancer, according to a study at Yale School of Medicine.
Onset of Psychosis may be delayed by medication
22 March, 2007
For young people who clearly seem to be developing early signs of schizophrenia, treatment with the antipsychotic drug olanzapine appears to lower or delay the rate of conversion to full-blown psychosis, according to an article by a Yale School of Medicine researcher in the May issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry.
Understanding the mystery of immune defects
21 March, 2007
The protein Myo1f is important in regulating how quickly the immune system mobilizes to fight off infection and may help explain some infection fighting disorders, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in Science.
Some people would give life or limb not to be fat
21 March, 2007
Nearly half of the people responding to an online survey about obesity said they would give up a year of their life rather than be fat, according to a study by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale.
Creative criting increases physician observation skills and connection to patients
20 March, 2007
Teaching creative writing to residents in an intensive workshop at Yale School of Medicine improved physicians
Animals provide early warning of Bioterrorism Agents
20 March, 2007
Pets, wildlife or livestock could act as sentinels to provide early warning for humans and could help identify many ongoing exposure risks for certain bioterrorism agents, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found in a study published in Emerging Infectious Diseases.
Genes and life stress interact in the brain
19 March, 2007
People who carry a particular genetic variation are more likely to respond to stress by becoming depressed and by ruminating on the event, according to a study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, and the University of W
Cultural approach is key to tackling obesity
19 March, 2007
Culture plays a significant role in how women perceive obesity in terms of both appearance and health, according to a study by Yale School of Nursing researchers in the Journal of Advanced Nursing.
Low oxygen preserves usefulness of stem cells
18 March, 2007
Low levels of oxygen, or hypoxia, may help preserve the unique undifferentiated nature of stem or progenitor cells, according to a report by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
Stopping diarrhea caused by Bacteria
18 March, 2007
Turning on a surface receptor in cells lining the intestinal wall can halt the often deadly diarrhea brought on by the bacteria V. cholera and E. coli, according to a Yale School of Medicine study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Hormone linked to brain
17 March, 2007
Ghrelin, a hormone produced in the stomach, induces food intake and operates through a brain region that controls cravings for food and other energy sources, researchers at Yale School of Medicine report in the online issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
Molecular basis for pain and inflammation in Erythromelalgia
17 March, 2007
A single mutation in an ion channel gene can produce opposing effects on signaling within the nervous system depending on the nerve cells in which it operates, shedding light on the molecular basis for erythromelalgia, a debilitating neuropathic pain syndrome, Yale School of Medicine researchers report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
First crystal structure of enzyme that works inside membranes
16 March, 2007
The structure of an enzyme that has many regulatory functions and breaks peptide bonds of proteins where they pass through membranes within the cell has been described for the first time by Yale School of Medicine researchers in Nature.
New clues to drug resistance in Ovarian Cancer
16 March, 2007
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine report that a specific defense mechanism used by the immune system is imitated by cancer cells in order to fight off the effects of cancer drugs like paclitaxel.
Yale researchers find stigmatizing overweight people can discourage dieting
15 March, 2007
A Yale University study of overweight people tested the claim that weight bias motivates people to lose weight and found the opposite can be the case, individuals cope with weight stigmatization through a variety of strategies, including eating more food and giving up on dieting.
Study finds less invasive surgery just as effective in infants with often fatal intestinal disorder
15 March, 2007
Two surgical procedures, one invasive and the other much less so, for premature infants with intestinal perforation due to necrotizing enterocolitis produce virtually identical results, according to a Yale School of Medicine study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Yale Journal identifies products that cause greatest environmental damage
14 March, 2007
Cutting-edge research identifying the types of products that cause the greatest environmental damage is the focus of a special issue of Yale
First in the Nation Radiation Plan
14 March, 2007
Yale School of Medicine has helped develop the first
HIV/AIDS linked to extensively drug resistant TB
13 March, 2007
A highly drug-resistant form of tuberculosis has been linked to HIV/AIDS in a study conducted in rural South Africa by researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Published in The Lancet, the study is the result of a five-year collaboration between a Yale and South African team of researchers who aim to integrate HIV and TB care and treatment.
Green tea and the Asian Paradox
13 March, 2007
There is a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer in Asia where people smoke heavily, which may be accounted for by high consumption of tea, particularly green tea, according to a review article published by a Yale School of Medicine researcher.
First | Prev  | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10  | Next  | Last
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo