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Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
Study suggests absence makes the heart grow weaker
University : 27 June, 2007
Severe feelings of social isolation are associated with as much as a 30 mmHg rise in a person's systolic blood pressure by the age of 65, which could easily push their systolic blood pressure over 150 mmHg, the medical definition of hypertension.
 
Post-traumatic stress disorder existed in Civil War
University : 27 June, 2007
According to a study, a look at the medical records of Civil War soldiers suggests post-traumatic stress disorder existed back then, too.
 
DNA coughed up with phlegm could point to lung cancer
Professional Society : 27 June, 2007
University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers who are developing an inexpensive and non-invasive gene probe to help diagnose early stage lung cancer in current and former smokers say DNA coughed up along with phlegm could point to lung cancer
 
Higher risk of developing breast cancer for 'DES daughters'
Professional Society : 27 June, 2007
 
Study says welfare reforms still fall short for most in need
University : 26 June, 2007
According to a new study that spotlights the severe personal problems afflicting the poorest families, several years into Wisconsin's stringent welfare-to-work program, which helped reduce welfare rolls in the state by 80 percent, the remaining welfare recipients fared poorly, seldom finding steady jobs or stable lives.
 
Is a patient ever too ill for medicine?
University : 26 June, 2007
According to medical guidelines, the patient had high cholesterol and should have been taking a drug to lower it. But her doctor didn't write a prescription. The drug was unlikely to help someone who was 100 years old and had advanced cancer. It wasn't worth the cost, side effects and hassle of taking yet another pill.
 
Downside to more downtime is hard work it takes to use it up
University : 26 June, 2007
In 1930, legendary economist John Maynard Keynes published an essay called 'Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren.'
 
Flaws in cancer clinical trials found by researchers
Professional Society : 26 June, 2007
According to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, cancer research and drug development are yielding more sophisticated candidate therapies, but investigators' methods to test them haven't kept pace.
 
Stem cell-like glioma cancer cells could hold key to brain tumor therapy
Professional Society : 26 June, 2007
A research team reported in the Cancer Research that stem cell-like glioma cancer cells that share many characteristics with normal stem cells propel the lethal growth of brain cancers by promoting tumor blood vessel formation, and may hold the key to treating these deadly cancers.
 
Explosive disorder affects 16 million
University : 25 June, 2007
Researchers from Harvard and the University of Chicago have found that one in 20 Americans may be susceptible to repeated, uncontrollable anger attacks in which they lash out in road rage, spousal abuse or other unjustifiably violent actions.
 
Is anything accomplished by praying?
University : 25 June, 2007
By Martin E. Marty, professor emeritus at the University of Chicago Divinity School. He is an ordained Lutheran minister and the author of 'When Faiths Collide.'
 
OTC medicines just as effective as expensive counterparts
University : 25 June, 2007
A study has found no difference in relieving seasonal hay fever symptoms between an over-the-counter decongestant and a prescription drug that costs more than three times as much.
 
Breast tumours fought off by peptide vaccine
Professional Society : 25 June, 2007
Assisted by immune system-stimulating molecules that mimic bacterial components, researchers have used a type of cancer vaccine to both delay and prevent breast tumors in mice.
 
Research and drug development are yielding more sophisticated candidate therapies
Professional Society : 25 June, 2007
According to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, cancer research and drug development are yielding more sophisticated candidate therapies, but investigators' methods to test them haven't kept pace. That could explain why so many experimental drugs fail in the final large and costly phase of testing, they say.
 
X-rays may raise breast cancer risk in women
University : 24 June, 2007
A study shows that chest X-rays may raise breast cancer risk in women with the gene mutations BRCA1 or BRCA2. Don't rush past that word 'may.' The researchers aren't totally certain of their findings, so they're not giving any advice just yet.
 
Dangers of new killer bug
University : 24 June, 2007
A 9-year-old boy from Chicago, Jewaun Smith, is lucky to be alive. A scrape on his left knee that he picked up riding his bike turned into a runaway infection that spread in a matter of days through the rest of his body, leaving his lungs riddled with holes. Jewaun managed to survive, but what worries doctors most about his near-death experience is that it's not an isolated case.
 
Vitamin D tablets found to cut the risk of pancreatic cancer
Professional Society : 24 June, 2007
According to a study led by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard universities, consumption of Vitamin D tablets was found to cut the risk of pancreatic cancer nearly in half.
 
Abstract Neuromotor Prostheses
University : 23 June, 2007
Abstract Neuromotor Prostheses aim to replace or restore lost motor functions in paralysed humans by routeing movement-related signals from the brain, around damaged parts of the nervous system, to external effectors.
 
Progress with brain-chip implants
University : 23 June, 2007
A 25-year-old man paralyzed from the neck down for five years has learned to use his thoughts to operate a computer, turn on a TV set, open email, play a video game and manipulate a robotic arm with a tiny electronic chip implanted in the motor cortex of his brain
 
Are we getting enough sleep?
University : 23 June, 2007
University of Chicago researchers who asked people to wear sleep-measuring devices found that the period of sleep was much shorter than the study subjects believed.
 
Drug protects postmenopausal women from developing invasive breast cancer
Professional Society : 23 June, 2007
According to a study, Raloxifene protects postmenopausal women from developing invasive breast cancer whether they are at high or low risk of developing the disease.
 
Greater risk of cancer for fearful types
University : 22 June, 2007
According to a University of Chicago study that might have implications for humans, a fearful personality increases the risk of cancer in rats. Researchers found that female rats hesitant to explore their surroundings were more likely to develop breast cancer than adventuresome rats.
 
Lack of sleep may hinder diabetes control
University : 22 June, 2007
According to a study, not getting enough shut eye each night or not sleeping well may contribute to reduced blood sugar control in African Americans with type 2, also referred to as adult-onset diabetes.
 
Minority women abandon big law firms due to bias
University : 22 June, 2007
An American Indian attorney is asked where she keeps her tomahawk. White male partners look past a black lawyer, assuming she is clerical staff. An Asian attorney is called a 'dragon lady' when she asserts herself.
 
tNOX may be more reliable than standard prostate specific antigen test
Professional Society : 22 June, 2007
Purdue University researchers have found a protein in the blood that may prove to be more reliable than the standard prostate specific antigen test in measuring the extent of prostate cancer.
 
PrepMe.com putting students to the test
University : 21 June, 2007
PrepMe.com, an online test preparation service that targets students bound for US colleges, is only 23 years old but has already had several brushes with the world of commerce.
 
More blacks than whites killed by breast cancer in Chicago
University : 21 June, 2007
Research showing an alarming gap in breast cancer death rates for black and white women in Chicago has mobilized health experts to find the root causes and recommend within a year ways to reduce the unusually high mortality among African-Americans.
 
Protein switching on brain's natural antioxidant defense system spotted
University : 21 June, 2007
Researchers in the U.S. say they've spotted a protein that switches on the brain's natural antioxidant defense system.
 
Lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers
Professional Society : 21 June, 2007
As diseases go, lung cancer is one of the most formidable. While it is one of the most preventable cancers, with the vast majority of 160,000 annual deaths in the United States due to smoking, it is invariably difficult to find early when it is most amenable to treatment. As a result, it remains the top cancer killer in the nation.
 
Research suggests vaccine may work against common infection
University : 20 June, 2007
A new vaccine may work against Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteria that causes a range of potentially fatal infections and has become resistant to many antibiotics.
 
MRSA infection risk for people in hospitals
University : 20 June, 2007
According to scientists, a vaccine to guard against hospital superbug MRSA is a step closer. US researchers have developed a vaccine that protected mice from four potentially deadly strains of MRSA.
 
Race and class studied in a divided city
University : 20 June, 2007
Why do some neighborhoods and cities go the way of East Cleveland, flipping from white to predominately poor and black nearly overnight, while others resist the tide?
 
REG1A and EXTL3 genes are overexpressed in colorectal tumors of patients who are at high risk of recurrence
Professional Society : 20 June, 2007
According to a new study from the Max Delbrueck Center in Berlin, Germany, two genes, known as REG1A and EXTL3, are overexpressed in colorectal tumors of patients who are at high risk of recurrence.
 
Study finds abuse can alter brain
University : 19 June, 2007
A new study on monkeys raised by abusive mothers suggests that growing up in an abusive household can alter brain chemistry in a way that makes some youngsters prone to mistreating their own children when they grow up.
 
Brain chemical linked to child-abuse perpetuation
University : 19 June, 2007
A report studying the role of a important brain chemical sheds new light on why victims of childhood abuse may themselves become abusers as adults, and points to a possible remedy.
 
Blowing bubbles isn
University : 19 June, 2007
The bizarre behavior of bubbles is helping scientists understand the physics of fluids, which govern everything from the bubbles in carbonated beverages to the venting of gas from deep oceanic fissures.
 
Researchers find molecular markers flagging presence of small metastases before reaching life-threatening size
Professional Society : 19 June, 2007
Patients with melanoma of the eye are at risk for liver metastases, which are often not detected until they have turned into large, lethal tumors. Now researchers have found molecular markers, including changes in a particular chromosome, that flag the presence of small metastases before they reach life-threatening size.
 
Research suggests human had sex with a Neanderthal and our brains are better for it today
University : 18 June, 2007
University of Chicago researchers suggest that 37,000 years ago a human had sex with a Neanderthal and our brains are better for it today, in a report sure to stir controversy.
 
Shyness may prevent you broadening your horizons, but could it also give you cancer?
University : 18 June, 2007
Being shy and reluctant to take chances may keep you from meeting new people or changing careers, but could it also give you cancer? That seemingly farfetched link is one focus of a University of Chicago research group that is trying to understand how temperament may affect a wide range of health yardsticks. Some experts refer to the discipline by the unwieldy name of psychoneuroimmunology.
 
Child-abuse perpetuation linked to brain chemical
University : 18 June, 2007
Research focusing on the role of a important brain chemical sheds new light on why victims of childhood abuse may themselves become abusers as adults, and points to a possible remedy.
 
Early metastasis of breast cancer detected by new technique
Professional Society : 18 June, 2007
According to research presented at the first international meeting on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development, organized by the American Association for Cancer Research, in the U.S. a novel technology soon may be available to detect the spread, or metastasis, of breast cancer earlier than now possible.
 
Organisms surviving Earth's mass extinctions subsequently failed to achieve evolutionary success
University : 17 June, 2007
According to a study published by the University of Chicago
 
Proof of human pheromones established
University : 17 June, 2007
A researcher at the University of Chicago has established the first scientific proof for human pheromones, compounds undetectable as odors but which have a major impact on the timing of ovulation.
 
Language learning is resilient, research shows
University : 17 June, 2007
University of Chicago research shows children apparently have an inherent ability to form words and sentences independent of the capacity they have to imitate the language of their parents.
 
Obese patients fare worse following diagnosis of colon cancer
University : 17 June, 2007
A new study shows that obese patients are more likely to have a recurrence of colon cancer than their normal-weight counterparts and face an increased risk of dying from the disease.
 
Majority feel smokers should pay more health insurance in US study
University : 17 June, 2007
A National Opinion Research Center study at the University of Chicago found that sixty percent believe that smokers should pay more for health insurance and another 29 percent said the obese should pay more. Only 12 percent believe it is appropriate for people with family histories of heart disease or cancer to pay more.
 
Neanderthals may have given humans a gene that helped them develop superior brains
University : 17 June, 2007
US researchers say that neanderthals may have given the modern humans who replaced them a priceless gift, a gene that helped them develop superior brains. And the only way they could have provided that gift would have been by interbreeding, the team at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Chicago said.
 
Protein in blood may prove to be a biomarker
Professional Society : 17 June, 2007
A Maryland-based pharmaceutical company has preliminary evidence showing that a protein in the blood may prove to be a biomarker that is more sensitive and specific than current methods of early detection for prostate cancer.
 
Environmental factors influence ability to learn
University : 16 June, 2007
University of Chicago research has shown that children
 
Ability to grasp simple maths shown by children as young as 3
University : 16 June, 2007
According to research by Susan Levine and Janellen Huttenlocher, both Professors of Psychology at the University of Chicago. Regardless of their backgrounds, children as young as 3 have the ability to recognize numbers, and add and subtract.
 
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