Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
Sexual practices differ between US and Britain
University : 16 June, 2007
Sex habits in the United States and Britain shows that Americans are more likely than Britons to have multiple sex partners, which may explain why the rates of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases are much higher in the United States than Britain, according to a new University of Chicago study.
 
Earth: How did life begin?
University : 16 June, 2007
How did life begin on Earth? University of Chicago geophysicist Joseph V. Smith, in a Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences paper, provides a theory for how small organic molecules may have been able to assemble on the surfaces of minerals into self-replicating biomolecules, the essential building blocks of life.
 
When heart patients die, what happens to the defibrillators and pacemakers implanted in their chests?
University : 16 June, 2007
A used pacemaker could keep someone else ticking but most aren't removed from patients who die. Pacemakers typically cost $4,000 or $5,000, and defibrillators $20,000 to $30,000. Yet even though these expensive devices often have years more of useful life, they are usually buried with patients.
 
Firstborn to women under 25 years old tend to live longer than their brothers and sisters
University : 16 June, 2007
According to a study, those born first to women younger than 25 are twice as likely to defy the average life span and go on to live beyond 100. Leonid A. Gavrilov and his colleagues at the University of Chicago's Center for Aging have relied on a wealth of Internet data, from genealogy Web sites to federal death indexes, to study centenarians to figure out why so many firstborns seem to outpace their younger siblings in the longevity race.
 
Chances of reaching 100 years may depend on age of your mother when you were born
University : 16 June, 2007
US researchers say your chances of living to 100 may depend on how young your mother was when she gave birth to you. A team at the University of Chicago found that people born to women younger than 25 were about twice as likely to live for a century or longer than people born to older mothers.
 
Pancreatic cancer stem cells indentified by researchers
Professional Society : 16 June, 2007
University of Michigan Medical Center scientists have, for the first time, identified human pancreatic cancer stem cells. Their work indicates that these cells are likely responsible for the aggressive tumor growth, progression, and metastasis that define this deadly cancer.
 
New method to detect a spectrum of known gene mutations in a variety of cancer
Professional Society : 16 June, 2007
Scientists have devised a new method to detect a spectrum of known gene mutations in a variety of cancer genes that they say is both sensitive and cost-effective. They say that if validated, this method of genotyping might ultimately be used in
 
Brain architecture, an insight
University : 15 June, 2007
Researchers are deducing the internal circuitry of the visual brain by mathematically reproducing the geometric hallucinations people see when they ingest mind-altering drugs, view bright, flickering lights or encounter near-death experiences.
 
Juveniles react to punishment just as adult criminals do
University : 15 June, 2007
According to a new paper by Steven Levitt, Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, increased punishment of juveniles reduces the amount of crime they commit in a way similiar to the impact punishment has for adults.
 
Blind children gesture just as sighted people do according to research
University : 15 June, 2007
According to a paper by University of Chicago scholars published in the journal Nature blind children use gestures as part of speech much the same way that sighted children do.
 
Pace of evolutionary change among the thousands of genes expressed in brain tissue slowing down
University : 15 June, 2007
Scientists in Washington have discovered that despite the explosive growth in size and complexity of the human brain, the pace of evolutionary change among the thousands of genes expressed in brain tissue has actually slowed since the split between human and chimpanzee millions of years ago.
 
Many board members may have gained from backdating
University : 15 June, 2007
According to a study, almost 1,400 corporate board members appear to have profited from the manipulation of stock option grant dates over a 10-year period.
 
Patients threatened by sleepy doctors
University : 15 June, 2007
Think of yourself as a hospital patient. Your doctor walks in and lets out a long yawn. When you ask why he is so tired, he admits to working nonstop for the last 24 hours. He says that he works these marathon shifts many times a month.
 
Colorectal carcinomas, new biomarker for survival prediction revealed
Professional Society : 15 June, 2007
According to a study at Yale University School of Medicine, levels of a protein called thymidylate synthase within two separate compartments of a tumor cell, the nucleus and the cytoplasm, may be critical markers predicting survival in colorectal cancer.
 
Infliximab can prolong remissions in Crohn's disease according to research
University : 14 June, 2007
A multi-center research team in The Lancet reports that sustained treatment with the monoclonal antibody infliximab can prolong remissions in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease.
 
Research shows that speakers overestimate their effectiveness
University : 14 June, 2007
University of Chicago research suggests you may be right in thinking the people you talk to every day often don
 
First scientific evidence for inherited preferences discovered
University : 14 June, 2007
Researchers at the University of Chicago have found that women prefer the scent of some men over other men because of genes they have inherited from their fathers. This is the first time scientists have demonstrated that people can actually inherit preferences, said Martha K. McClintock, the David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor in Psychology at the University, and the co-author of a paper that will be published in the journal Nature Genetics.
 
Syrian ruins bear the scars of a City
University : 14 June, 2007
In the upper reaches of what was ancient Mesopotamia, archaeologists digging in Syria have found new evidence of how one of the world
 
Researchers study question as feds rate Chicago worst among big cities in USA
University : 14 June, 2007
In the University of Chicago's 'King Lab'' there are no beakers or Bunsen burners. A leather couch, an ottoman, a TV. Not a bad place to kick back and have a drink. That's what happens there, as researchers with the Chicago Social Drinking Project try to crack some of the mysteries of alcohol, in particular why some people binge on booze and others don't.
 
America too reliant on fossil fuel and needs to find a new path quickly
University : 14 June, 2007
The world overly dependent on one source of energy: fossil fuels. America's security depends on it but needs to find a new path and fast.
 
Researchers find angiogenesis inhibitors effective in metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer treatment
Professional Society : 14 June, 2007
According to accumulating evidence, angiogenesis inhibitors can be far more effective in treating metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer, an aggressive form of the most common kind of kidney cancer that is also rich in blood supply, than traditional treatments. They can prolong life in about a third of patients, but researchers have not been able to identify the responding patients, prior to treatment.
 
The evolution game
University : 13 June, 2007
According to a new study published by the University of Chicago
 
An extract from ginseng berry extract provides hope for diabetes and obesity
University : 13 June, 2007
A research team from the University of Chicago's Tang Center for Herbal Medicine Research reports that a ginseng berry extract shows real promise in treating diabetes and obesity. In the June issue of the journal Diabetes, they show that the extract completely normalized blood glucose levels, improved sensitivity to insulin, lowered cholesterol levels, and decreased weight by reducing appetite and increasing activity levels in mice bred to develop diabetes.
 
Ultrasensitive magnetic sensors built by physicists
University : 13 June, 2007
Researchers led by physicists at the University of Chicago report in the journal Nature that they have combined non-magnetic materials into megagauss sensors, the most sensitive magnetic sensors ever developed for extremely large fields. The sensors
 
Researchers build ultrasensitive magnetic sensors
University : 13 June, 2007
Physicists leading a research team at the University of Chicago report in the journal Nature that they have combined non-magnetic materials into megagauss sensors, the most sensitive magnetic sensors ever developed for extremely large fields. The sensors
 
Mixing grapefruit and medicine
University : 13 June, 2007
University of Chicago researchers think they can put the possibly dangerous interaction of grapefruit and some medications to good use and save lives.
 
60-year-old monitor of nuclear threats updated
University : 13 June, 2007
The Doomsday Clock, based at the University of Chicago, has been updated by scientists.
 
A time of uncertainty for nuclear age
University : 13 June, 2007
When the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists unveils the first change to the Doomsday Clock in four years, the risk of a nuclear holocaust will be just one among many threats that nudge the position of the clock's portentous minute hand. The keepers of the clock have expanded its purview to include the threat of global warming, the genetic engineering of diseases and other 'threats to global survival.'
 
Ancient mysteries unveiled by satellite technology
University : 13 June, 2007
Mapping software and spy-satellite photos are being used by The University of Chicago's Oriental Institute to unravel the mysteries of how people lived, traveled and built civilizations.
 
Test discovered to predict prognosis with treatment of p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy
Professional Society : 13 June, 2007
A routine laboratory test that predicted poor outcome from traditional radiation and chemotherapy treatment for head and neck cancers has now been found to predict a good prognosis with treatment of p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy, making it potentially the first predictive biomarker test for a gene-based drug.
 
Astronomers
University : 12 June, 2007
According to a discovery that University of Chicago astrophysicists will announce at the COSMO-02 conference at Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, the universe really is as surprising as scientists have come to suspect it is, The discovery, which astrophysicists have pursued with increasingly sensitive instruments for more than two decades, verifies the framework that supports modern cosmological theory.
 
Research shows babies are not as numerically gifted as previously thought
University : 12 June, 2007
Results of a 10-year evaluation by leading scholars at the University of Chicago disputes the theory that babies are bright enough to count before their first birthday.
 
Diabetes drug endangers heart, causes arteries to spasm
University : 12 June, 2007
A University of Chicago-based research team reports in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that oral medications most widely used to lower blood-sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes are likely to increase the risk of spasm of the coronary arteries. Constricted arteries increase blood pressure and decrease blood flow to the heart, causing chest pain and even sudden death, shows the study, which focused on mice with a genetic defect that duplicates the actions of these drugs.
 
A student's grade point average is a strong predictor of behavior
University : 12 June, 2007
A major U.S. survey of more than 13,000 teenagers is the first to examine the relationship between behavior and grade point averages across ethnic groups, although there have been other studies that have shown in general that students with good grades also are more likely to stay out of trouble.
 
New research helps predict results of proposed changes in distribution channels
University : 12 June, 2007
Numerous simple and effective methods exist for measuring the profit impact of three of the four P
 
Colour builds language and language builds colour
University : 12 June, 2007
LANGUAGES divide the spectrum up in different ways. Welsh speakers use
 
Helping physicians decide when to switch from Gleevec to Sutent
Professional Society : 12 June, 2007
Scientists have discovered that the same gene mutation responsible for a tepid response to Gleevec (imatinib) in treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, bestows benefit when a newer targeted therapy, Sutent (sunitinib), is used.
 
Building hybrid structures at the atomic scale
University : 11 June, 2007
Scientists from across the country will convene at the University of Chicago to discuss the emerging field of nanohybrid structures. Nanoscientists build these structures to develop smaller, faster computers, accelerate drug discovery and development, and spur a variety of other potential applications.
 
Women
University : 11 June, 2007
According to a paper by an expert on sexual relationships at the University of Chicago and based on a new global study, women are much less likely to have age-related sexual dysfunction, in contrast to men, whose erectile dysfunction increases with age.
 
University of Chicago chemists synthesize electronic component in the drive toward miniaturize electronic devices
University : 11 June, 2007
Chemists at the University of Chicago have successfully synthesized an electronic component the size of a single molecule that could prove crucial in the continuing push to molecular electronic devices.
 
Channels on the surface of Mars presumably cut by flowing liquid water
University : 11 June, 2007
Evidence from photographs, provided by Viking, Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor, indicates deep channels on the surface of Mars presumably cut by flowing liquid water. How could Mars, at Pathfinder
 
When you spill a drop of coffee, why is there always a dark ring at the outer edge on drying?
University : 11 June, 2007
Why, when you spill a drop of coffee on your countertop, is there always a ring of dark stuff at the outer edge after it dries? Sidney Nagel and his colleagues at the University of Chicago wondered about it enough to find out that nobody actually knew the answer
 
Religion used by men to exert control over women
University : 11 June, 2007
50 figures from the world of faith engage weekly in a conversation about some aspect of religion. This week, panel members were asked: 'Have women fared well or badly in the world's religions down through the ages? Why?'
 
Possible biomarker for gauging anti-angiogenic drugs effectiveness
Professional Society : 11 June, 2007
According to National Cancer Institute research, if an anti-angiogenic drug is successfully starving a cancer patient
 
Quantum cryptography enhanced by new technologies
National Laboratory : 10 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, in collaboration with researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colo., and Albion College, in Albion, Mich., have achieved quantum key distribution at telecommunications industry wavelengths in a 50-kilometer (31 mile) optical fiber. The work could accelerate the development of QKD for secure communications in optical fibers at distances beyond current technological limits.
 
New method for using a laser beam to accelerate ions developed
National Laboratory : 10 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Nevada, Reno, Ludwig-Maximilian-University in Germany, and the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics in Germany, have developed a new method for using a laser beam to accelerate ions. The novel method may enable important advances in compact ion accelerators, medical physics and inertial confinement fusion.
 
New method for studying ion channel kinetics proposed
National Laboratory : 10 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for the study of ion channel gating kinetics. An ion channel is a protein pore that lets ions (charged atoms such as calcium) pass through a cell's membrane. The method fits data to a new class of models, called manifest interconductance rank models, which will give researchers a better understanding of the mechanisms by which ion channels open and close.
 
Forest fire dynamics help scientists to better understand brain activity
University : 10 June, 2007
Researchers at the University of Chicago, using forest fire dynamics to better understand brain activity, have identified a new pattern of simulated neural behavior that lends fresh insight into the brain's inner workings. In this pattern the neurons fire in clustered bursts of activity instead of in spirals or waves.
 
Ancient road system revealed by satellite photographs
University : 10 June, 2007
In Syria, ancient roads, clearly visible in a CORONA satellite surveillance photograph, extend from the ancient city of Tell Hamoukar, site of Oriental Institute excavations. One road goes to the southwest and forms a fork. The road connected the ancient settlement with another several miles away.
 
Teacher and parent conversation important in child language development say researchers
University : 10 June, 2007
Research at the University of Chicago show that individual differences in syntax acquisition are heavily influenced by the language environment a child experiences. The finding challenges a long-standing contention that syntax, the organization of words into a sentence, develops uniformly and naturally because of inborn characteristics.
 
First | Prev  | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12  | Next  | Last
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo