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Biomaterials
Aspirin agent aids plants against virus
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2006
Yet another extraordinary ability of the active ingredient in aspirin, salicylic acid, has just been identified by plant scientists working at the University of Cambridge, researchers heard at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
Microbes on the move, Microbiology Today: November 2005 issue
Biomaterials : 03 November, 2005
Clouds of desert dust are moving vast numbers of microbes around the globe, which can be harmful or beneficial to downwind communities, according to an article in the November 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology.
 
Bird 'flu: not the only flying hazard, Microbiology Today: November 2005 issue
Biomaterials : 03 November, 2005
Our view of wild birds is mostly positive. They are a lovely sight as they soar through the air or drift lazily on updrafts. But there is a downside to this beauty. Birds are reservoirs for all manner of infectious disease and we can do little about it, according to an article in the November 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology.
 
Preserving food by stopping bacteria blabbering
Biomaterials : 14 September, 2005
Understanding the language that bacteria use to communicate with each other may lead to new food preservation methods, according to Danish scientists at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
 
What lies beneath? Life deep underground offers nuclear safety
Biomaterials : 13 September, 2005
Microbes may assist the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel deep underground for a hundred thousand years, according to Swedish scientists speaking today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK
 
New metal munching microbes, bug batteries and automatic miners
Biomaterials : 13 September, 2005
Electricity generated by bugs living deep in metal rich mud, cleaning up contaminated land, and mining metals automatically using microbes are just some of the most likely possibilities for the future, according to research discussed at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
 
Vaccine for typhoid and food poisoning possible, after scientists decode structure of proteins and stomach sugars
Biomaterials : 13 September, 2005
Scientists have identified a key molecule used by Salmonella food poisoning bacteria to break into our gut walls, leading to hope for a vaccine, in research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
 
Methane eating undersea bugs prevent greenhouse gases getting out
Biomaterials : 13 September, 2005
13 September 2005 Methane eating undersea bugs prevent greenhouse gases getting out Scientists have discovered how microbes in the sea play a crucial part in preventing huge quantities of the greenhouse gas methane from reaching the atmosphere, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK. Methane is not just produced in rubbish tips, it also comes in huge quantities from decomposing seaweeds and tiny creatures which fall to the seabed. But other micro-organisms manage to consume more than 80% of the methane before it can bubble up through the seawater and reach the atmosphere, causing massive global warming. 'Scientists are just beginning to understand the importance of these marine ecosystems, which work without any oxygen,' says Dr Martin Kr
 
Fungi can help plants cope with toxic metals in the soil and clean up pollution say scientists
Biomaterials : 13 September, 2005
Friendly fungi living on the roots of plants can help them find nutrients for themselves and the plants, deal with toxic metals in the soil, and help clean up contaminated sites according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
 
GBS vaccine hope for newborn babies
Biomaterials : 13 September, 2005
Group B Streptococcusare the most common bacteria attacking newborn babies, affecting 1 in 1000 births, and killing up to 6% of those infected. Now microbiologists may be closer to finding a way of protecting against them, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
 
Wilting threat to commercial glasshouse tomato crop
Biomaterials : 12 September, 2005
Commercial tomatoes have been bred to resist Verticillium wilt, but new strains of the fungus have appeared, attacking glasshouse crops in Britain and the Netherlands. Now scientists are fighting back using DNA forensics, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK.
 
Cot death clues from superbug survival strategy
Biomaterials : 12 September, 2005
Bacteria linked to cot death could be surviving in babies' mattresses, particularly in damp conditions, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK. Scientists from Leicester found that of the bacteria studied, a common bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus, closely related to the hospital superbug, was the most successful at surviving for long periods in infant cots.
 
Gum disease
Biomaterials : 12 September, 2005
Gum diseases caused by bacteria that can survive in the harsh environment of the human mouth may be preventable in future, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 157th Meeting at Keele University, UK. 'The NHS already spends
 
Killer into cure - using viruses to treat cancer
Biomaterials : 29 July, 2005
The natural ability of viruses to infect and destroy cells is being used by scientists to kill cancerous tumours, according to an article in the August 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. Professor Moira Brown of Southern General Hospital in Glasgow explains how viruses that cause common diseases, such as cold sores and 'flu, have been modified so that they are no longer harmful, but can target and kill only cancerous cells.
 
Deep sea algae connect ancient climate, carbon dioxide and vegetation
Biomaterials : 22 June, 2005
Assistant Professor Mark Pagani in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Yale and his colleagues mapped the first detailed history of atmospheric carbon dioxide between 45
 
Home composting could cut down greenhouse gas
Biomaterials : 05 May, 2005
Composting household organic waste not only reduces landfill disposal, but could also help to cut greenhouse gases according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. The UK currently dumps about 85% of its domestic waste straight into landfill and much of this is biodegradable. Anaerobic microbial decomposition of organic waste in landfills generates methane, a principal greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.
 
Home composting could cut down greenhouse gas - Microbiology Today: May 2005 issue
Biomaterials : 05 May, 2005
Composting household organic waste not only reduces landfill disposal, but could also help to cut greenhouse gases according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. The UK currently dumps about 85% of its domestic waste straight into landfill and much of this is biodegradable. Anaerobic microbial decomposition of organic waste in landfills generates methane, a principal greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.
 
Barbecue food risks blamed on global warming
Biomaterials : 05 May, 2005
Global warming holds an additional risk to the people of Britain, according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. Rises in temperature and longer days mean that more of us will be tempted by the lure of the barbecue, which could be followed by an unwelcome dose of food poisoning. Already, at the first sign of sun, people dust down the grill and head outside to cook.
 
Chemically-conscious gardeners use bugs to beat back the weeds
Biomaterials : 05 May, 2005
Organic gardeners can control pesky weeds with the help of some common soil microbes, according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. As Robert J Kremer of the University of Missouri explains, soil that suppresses the growth of weeds isn't science fiction and doesn't involve chemical fertilisers and herbicides.
 
Phosphates through fungi could reduce fertiliser use
Biomaterials : 05 May, 2005
Scientists are looking to a little known, but very widespread, phenomenon to provide a natural source of fertilisers for plants and crops, according to an article in the May 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. 'Remarkably, most plants are not just plants; they are symbioses with fungi,' explains Professor Alastair Fitter, from the University of York. Professor Fitter is studying this marvellous alliance of plant roots and fungi, called a mycorrhiza, to find out how they work together to survive.
 
Georgia Tech research reveals how biomaterial properties control cellular responses
Biomaterials : 18 April, 2005
The body treats implanted medical devices
 
Asian bird 'flu vaccine now safe enough to use, but can we make it?
Biomaterials : 06 April, 2005
Scientists have managed to manipulate the deadly Asian bird 'flu virus to make it safe enough to use in the laboratory, giving us hope of an effective vaccine, according to research to be presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. Increasing numbers of fatal bird influenza cases in humans during the last nine years in South-east Asia have raised international fears of another global 'flu pandemic. The virus has already killed three-quarters of the people infected, but if the strains known as H5N1 gain the ability to jump from person to person the effects will be devastating according to experts.
 
Traditional brass pitchers may hold the secret of safe drinking water
Biomaterials : 06 April, 2005
Where there's brass there may be no muck, say researchers looking at the safety of drinking water kept in traditional pitchers in rural India, and presenting their work at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. Transporting and storing water in brass pitchers may be saving lives in rural India, according to researchers from Northumbria University in Newcastle upon Tyne. The scientists looked at the effectiveness of storing contaminated water for over two days in traditional brass, earthenware and modern plastic containers.
 
Using microbes to mine metals and clean up spoil
Biomaterials : 06 April, 2005
Mineral loving microbes are used to mine metals and could be used to clear up corrosive acid pollution left over from industrial workings, say Welsh scientists speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. Mankind has been using metals for thousands of years, and we even name key stages of our civilisation such as the Iron Age and Bronze Age after them. But micro-organisms have been using metals for millions of years, as food, as energy sources, and instead of oxygen to breathe.
 
Using biosensor bugs to spot heavy metals in sewage sludge fertiliser
Biomaterials : 06 April, 2005
Sewage sludge is a cheap fertiliser, and spreading it on forest floors should be a good way to dispose of it. But sewage can contain metals like copper or lead that can be dangerous at high concentrations, so it needs a safety check first. Researchers think they have finally found a cheap way to test its toxicity, scientists will hear at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
 
Salmon farm killer tamed by bug bug
Biomaterials : 06 April, 2005
Newly hatched salmon and trout can be devastated by bacteria, destroying the livelihoods and commercial viability of fish farms. But now US scientists hope that they have found a way to substantially reduce fish deaths without using expensive antibiotics or vaccines, according to research at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
 
Stitching up MRSA with viruses
Biomaterials : 05 April, 2005
Nylon strips, beads and hospital stitching thread covered in viruses could be an effective weapon against the hospital acquired superbug, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
 
Viruses could deliver HIV, malaria, rabies and cancer vaccines as pills
Biomaterials : 05 April, 2005
Rabies, HIV, cancer and malaria could all be prevented with pills in the future, if a new technique using specially modified viruses to deliver vaccines is adopted, according to scientists speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. 'We can take a special type of virus which only infects bacteria, called a bacteriophage, and replace some of its DNA with vaccine DNA, and then use the phage to deliver vaccines in a highly efficient way,' says Dr John March of the Moredun Research Institute, Penicuik, near Edinburgh.
 
Microbiologists discover how food poisoning E. coli O157 became so toxic
Biomaterials : 05 April, 2005
Twenty-three years ago a harmless gut bacterium called E. coli developed the ability to kill people through food poisoning, bloody diarrhoea and kidney failure. Scientists are now beginning to understand this phenomenon, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
 
Scientists find how pneumonia bacteria get sugar boost to survive
Biomaterials : 04 April, 2005
Meningitis and pneumonia bacteria smash into our lungs and cells to steal sugar, which helps them survive, according to research presented today from King's College and Guy's Hospital London, at the Society for General Microbiology's 156th Meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
 
Millions could be relieved by crystal-free catheters
Biomaterials : 09 February, 2005
Investigations into the bacteria that infest urinary catheters could relieve millions of patients each year from the discomfort of recurrent infection, according to an article in the February 2005 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology.
 
Spider silks, the ecological materials of tomorrow?
Biomaterials : 30 November, 2004
Spider silks could become the intelligent materials of the future, according to a review article published this month in the journal Microbial Cell Factories. The characteristics of spider silk could have applications in areas ranging from medicine to ballistics.
 
Bioresorbable polymer set for incorporation into stents
Biomaterials : 23 November, 2004
The New Jersey Center for Biomaterials has generated what it hopes to be the beginning of a technology transfer success story that originated through the work of Rutgers University Professor Joachim Kohn in his search for improved biomaterials.
 
Scientists achieve self-assembly of spider silk fibre in insect cells
Biomaterials : 23 November, 2004
For the first time anywhere, scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and from Germany have succeeded in producing self-assembled spider web fibres under laboratory conditions, outside of the bodies of spiders. This fibre is significantly stronger than the silk fibre made by silkworms.
 
Real super-bugs can save the planet
Biomaterials : 26 October, 2004
Beneficial bacteria have fast-tracked evolution to solve some of our pollution problems, according to an article in the November 2004 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology. Using the same mechanisms that have allowed hospital superbugs to survive in the presence of antibiotics, many bacteria have changed their behaviour and now use our toxic chemicals as a source of food.
 
Thrush fungus may mate when the going gets tough
Biomaterials : 26 October, 2004
Fungi that infect man do not easily learn to become resistant to antifungal drugs. However, antifungal resistance sometimes arises and, according to an article in the November 2004 issue of Microbiology Today, the quarterly magazine of the Society for General Microbiology, new studies suggest that when one important fungal pathogen does so, it can rearrange its genetic makeup to favour mating and other changes that could accelerate its evolution.
 
How new diseases from insects hit people like the plague
Biomaterials : 08 September, 2004
Scientists have traced the first steps in the way some new diseases emerge, and how harmless bacteria living in insects become dangerous disease-causing bugs which can affect humans, like the plague or anthrax. Researchers from the University of Bath are presenting their results at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Win-win with biodegradable plastics from toxic waste
Biomaterials : 08 September, 2004
A biodegradable plastic made from toxic waste could solve pollution problems, scientists from Dublin announced at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Drug-resistant hospital bugs also learning to beat disinfectant say scientists
Biomaterials : 08 September, 2004
Dangerous multi-drug-resistant bacteria are also developing immunity to hospital disinfectants and antiseptics, according to new research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Functional foods offer hope for fighting infections
Biomaterials : 08 September, 2004
Upset stomachs and gut diseases are a common problem amongst our increasingly elderly population, but now help may be on hand using friendly bacteria isolated from the intestines of healthy elderly individuals, according to scientists at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Bug factories for drugs: quality control holds key to quantity
Biomaterials : 08 September, 2004
Tiny types of soil bugs already make many of the products we use in washing detergents, foods, and waste treatment, but scientists now hope that similar bacteria will also make the vaccines and drugs of the future, according to new research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Virus product could kill anthrax and beat antibiotic resistance
Biomaterials : 07 September, 2004
Researchers from Rockefeller University, New York, have developed a new way of killing dangerous bacteria like the ones which cause anthrax and pneumonia, using products from a virus, according to new research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Fish slime crock of gold at end of rainbow
Biomaterials : 06 September, 2004
The slippery mucus on the skin of rainbow trout is being studied by scientists as a possible source of new medicines to fight infectious diseases, according to research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Bee sting antibiotics could beat superbugs
Biomaterials : 06 September, 2004
Bee stings may provide a solution to overcome the growing problem of antibiotic resistance in bacteria according to new research presented by Belfast scientists at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Silencing bacteria could stop infections and save lives say scientists
Biomaterials : 06 September, 2004
Stopping bacteria from talking to each other could help prevent serious infections say scientists from Aberdeen, in new research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Honey helps healing say scientists
Biomaterials : 06 September, 2004
Honey could be the new antibiotic, according to scientific research from the University of Wales Institute Cardiff presented at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
New solution to stop tooth rot
Biomaterials : 06 September, 2004
About half of today's children have tooth decay, so a new solution that blocks the action of bacteria which attack teeth could bring significant benefits, say scientists speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 155th Meeting at Trinity College Dublin.
 
Air travel aids viruses to go here, there and everywhere
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
Air travel, increasing urbanization and modern farming practices are all helping to spread deadly virus diseases carried by blood-sucking mosquitoes and ticks, according to scientists from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology at Oxford, speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
New, classier route to killing superbugs
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
Scientists from the New Jersey University of Medicine and Dentistry have discovered a whole new class of enzymes which may represent a major advance in understanding the way bacterial cells self destruct under stress, researchers will hear at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
Interfering with ways in which viruses counteract the immune response may lead to novel vaccines
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
Novel vaccines to some viruses may be possible due to work studying the way viruses block our bodies' natural defence mechanisms, scientists from the University of St Andrews will announce at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
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