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Biomaterials
How Hairpin Probe and Gold Gets Bad Bugs Glowing
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
Using tiny amounts of gold and a genetic 'hairpin probe', US scientists have developed a sensor which will aid hospitals in the fight against serious infections such as Staphylococcus aureus, researchers from the University of Rochester, New York, will announce at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
Hope for flu fight as researchers crack communication
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
Finding the way influenza viruses multiply may lead to new medicines which can fight all varieties of flu, according to German medical researchers speaking at the Society for General Microbiology meeting in Bath.
 
Fruit flies in fight against flu and fevers
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
West Nile virus and dengue fever, two of the most feared diseases spread by mosquitoes and other biting insects, could be controlled in future by using techniques learned from studying the influenza virus, fruit flies and plants, according to scientists from the University of California speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
Climate keeps tick-borne diseases in check
Biomaterials : 29 March, 2004
The blood-sucking ticks that spread microbes, causing disease in livestock and people, are very sensitive to the weather. So different sorts of microbes cycle between ticks and their hosts in the UK and in other parts of Europe where the summers are warmer and drier. This has obvious implications for the possible effects of environmental changes occurring now, Oxford University scientists said at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath.
 
Some bacterial toxins could cause cancer says scientist
Biomaterials : 25 March, 2004
A possible link between cancer and toxins or poisons produced by bacteria has been suggested by King's College London scientists, the Society for General Microbiology's meeting in Bath will hear next week.
 
Reducing the risks of GM micro-organisms
Biomaterials : 09 December, 2003
Scientists have developed a system to increase the safety of genetically modified microbes for release into the environment. Release of GM micro-organisms is a cause of great concern to many, because the microbes could pass on genes for disease or other harmful traits to others. But, a team of researchers from Spain and Germany believes that it is possible to reduce this risk.
 
New bug to tackle pollution
Biomaterials : 10 October, 2003
A new, all-natural, pollutant-busting microbe has been discovered by scientists in Germany. Research published in the October 2003 issue of Microbiology, a Society for General Microbiology journal, describes a new strain of bacterium, which could be used in the near future to clean up polluted land.
 
Helping Cystic Fibrosis patients beat bugs
Biomaterials : 10 September, 2003
People with weakened immune systems, including patients with cystic fibrosis could be better protected in future from a highly resilient bacteria, thanks to work by medical scientists from the University of Leeds. The research is presented at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting at UMIST in Manchester.
 
Beating the blight of potato famine
Biomaterials : 10 September, 2003
Potato blight causes worldwide losses of
 
Stress lessons from yeast
Biomaterials : 10 September, 2003
The humble yeast can teach us vital lessons in coping with stress, according to researchers from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne.
 
Medical use for new sugar coated proteins
Biomaterials : 09 September, 2003
Making sugar coated proteins for use in medicines is a step closer thanks to a chance discovery by scientists from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The research is presented by Professor Brendan Wren at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting at UMIST in Manchester.
 
Progress against deadly E. coli bug
Biomaterials : 08 September, 2003
Scientists from the Institute for Animal Health announced progress towards controlling the deadly E. coli bacterium that causes food poisoning and kidney failure, at the Society for General Microbiology's meeting at UMIST in Manchester.
 
New category of antibiotics may present a fresh threat to public health
Biomaterials : 13 June, 2003
Bacteria have developed resistance to all antibiotics in use today, and this is causing a major health problem. However, a remarkable range of new antibiotics, called cationic antimicrobial peptides, is attracting increasing interest as a key weapon in the fight against bacterial infection.
 
Chickenpox vaccine could save children's lives and prevent shingles in later life
Biomaterials : 09 April, 2003
British children's lives might be saved by being routinely vaccinated for chickenpox, according to Dr Anne Gershon, speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh today.
 
Threat of bioterrorism- real or imagined?
Biomaterials : 08 April, 2003
Until a few years ago the threat to use microbes as biological weapons was practically ignored by doctors and scientists working in medicine and public health. Today there is every reason to believe that the threat of bioterrorism is not only real but is growing, according to Washington based public health expert Professor Donald Henderson, speaking in an invited lecture at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh.
 
Blood poisoning vaccine ready for human trials
Biomaterials : 08 April, 2003
A combined British and US research team has developed the world's first vaccine against endotoxin, which is a key cause of blood poisoning and death after major surgery for cancer or heart disease. The announcement was made at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh.
 
Harnessing microbes to kill cancer
Biomaterials : 08 April, 2003
An ingenious new way to attack cancer tumours is being developed by medical researchers from Nottingham as part of an EU consortium, the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh heard.
 
Safe vaccine to combat herpes infections
Biomaterials : 08 April, 2003
The unpleasant and painful sores, and infection of newborn babies caused by the genital herpes virus could soon be a thing of the past according to Dr Julian Hickling, who is presenting results from Xenova Research Ltd to the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh
 
Antibiotic resistance and gene transfer
Biomaterials : 07 April, 2003
The way antibiotic resistance spreads and possible problems from genes transferring have been identified by researchers from the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, in new evidence about the way genes pass from one bacteria to another. The research is presented by Dr Karen Scott at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh.
 
Artificial vaccines offer hope to prevent diseases
Biomaterials : 07 April, 2003
New work on artificially constructed viruses offers the hope of effective vaccines for devastating diseases in the future, according to researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in work presented at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburgh.
 
Risk of blood poisoning rises as medical treatment improves
Biomaterials : 07 April, 2003
Living longer and better medical treatments such as organ transplants and cancer therapy are all paradoxically increasing our risk of blood poisoning, according to experts in bacterial infections speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Meeting in Edinburg.
 
Safer flu vaccine in cold conditions
Biomaterials : 07 April, 2003
Using cold temperatures could help make quicker, cheaper and safer influenza vaccines, according to Dr Alison Whiteley at the Society for General Microbiology's Annual Meeting in Edinburg.
 
Microbes use sunscreens too!
Biomaterials : 19 September, 2002
Microbes can withstand extreme levels of atmospheric ultraviolet light by producing their own sunscreens. Unlike humans, some bugs may even be able to survive without any help from the ozone layer scientists heard at the Society for General Microbiology autumn meeting at Loughborough University.
 
Gene mutations, possible link to meningitis
Biomaterials : 19 September, 2002
Gene mutations may account for a third of all meningococcal meningitis in the UK scientists heard at the Society for General Microbiology autumn meeting at Loughborough University.
 
Don't smoke while feeding the birds: new research on lung disease
Biomaterials : 18 September, 2002
Scientists are developing a method that could prevent lung infections in people who smoke, according to a paper presented at the Society for General Microbiology autumn meeting at Loughborough University.
 
Catch MRSA infections while they're young
Biomaterials : 17 September, 2002
Laboratory studies showing how communities of MRSA bacteria build up on catheters could lead to improved treatments for hospital acquired infections, according to a paper presented at the Society for General Microbiology autumn meeting at Loughborough University.
 
Helping good bacteria win the war on dental disease
Biomaterials : 16 September, 2002
Good bacteria growing in dental plaque could help fight off bugs that cause gum disease and tooth decay if they are given a competitive edge, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology autumn meeting at Loughborough University.
 
Dental plaque: a breeding ground for antibiotic resistance
Biomaterials : 16 September, 2002
Gene swapping is taking place on your gums as the bacteria in dental plaque trade-up on newer antibiotic resistance genes, according to research at the Society for General Microbiology autumn meeting at Loughborough University.
 
Teachers discover bacteria prefer milk chocolate
Biomaterials : 17 July, 2002
Bacteria prefer milk chocolate to dark chocolate and will swim towards it on an agar plate, so teachers have found out at a summer school run by the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Reading. The experiment is one of a series of A-level practicals currently being produced for teachers by the Society.
 
Childless bacteria make better workers
Biomaterials : 17 June, 2002
Preventing microbes from reproducing is a new concept that has the potential to manufacture large quantities of important pharmaceutical proteins, according to an article in the May issue of Microbiology Today magazine from the Society for General Microbiology.
 
Improving the immune system using 'chatty' bacteria
Biomaterials : 10 April, 2002
Certain helpful bacteria are able to communicate with cells lining the gut causing the production of chemicals that can kill off harmful microbes when they try to invade, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Helping the aged gut replace good bacteria may reduce cancer risk
Biomaterials : 10 April, 2002
Eating certain foods can increase the number of protective microbes in the gut. These bacteria help prevent food poisoning and can reduce levels of some toxic chemicals that may cause cancer, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Pneumonia in transplant patients can be avoided
Biomaterials : 10 April, 2002
Life-threatening pneumonia in bone marrow transplant patients can be controlled using a strategy called pre-emptive therapy, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Bacteria change 'fingerprints' and baffle detectives
Biomaterials : 09 April, 2002
Tracing the source of a campylobacter food poisoning outbreak can be very difficult even with modern DNA fingerprinting methods. There is now evidence that campylobacters can rearrange their DNA, disguising their fingerprint, and confusing such detective work, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Vaccine could cut complications after surgery
Biomaterials : 09 April, 2002
A vaccine has been developed, which could prevent inflammation and illness caused by certain bacterial infections following major surgery, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Protein research could lead to new meningitis vaccine
Biomaterials : 09 April, 2002
New technology is leading to a vaccine against Group B Streptococci, a common cause of meningitis as well as a frequent cause of pneumonia in newborns. Key proteins have been found that can kick-start the immune system to fight these bacteria, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
HIV in the nervous system - still a cause for concern?
Biomaterials : 09 April, 2002
HIV infection can be controlled with antiretroviral drugs, but it cannot be wiped out. New evidence suggests that low levels of HIV may still lead to long-term brain damage and dementia, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Seek and destroy vaccines for meningitis outdated
Biomaterials : 08 April, 2002
The ability of meningococci bacteria to change their cell surface proteins could reduce the effectiveness of the current meningitis C vaccine. Now scientists are working on vaccines that would allow us to co-exist happily with these microbes, according to research presented at the Spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Vaccine puts blood-sucking ticks off their food
Biomaterials : 08 April, 2002
Ticks spread a greater variety of diseases than any other blood-feeding creature, including mosquitoes. Now scientists are developing vaccines that prevent ticks from digesting the blood of their animal or human victim, according to research presented at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
 
Uprooting and replanting the tree of life
Biomaterials : 14 January, 2002
A new theory on the evolution of ancient microbes is set to challenge widespread scientific views of early life on earth and could overturn previous interpretations of the huge bank of molecular taxonomic data that has been built up in recent years, according to research published today in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology.
 
Destruction of fruit bats' habitat could spread disease
Biomaterials : 11 January, 2002
New agricultural developments are destroying the habitats of protected fruit bat species in Australia, and could lead to the spread of deadly viral diseases to humans and farm animals, medical experts heard during a joint meeting of the European Societies of Clinical and Veterinary Virology and the Society for General Microbiology at the Royal College of Physicians, London.
 
Blocking nerve cells delays onset of prion disease
Biomaterials : 10 January, 2002
A chemical that specifically blocks parts of the nervous system can delay the onset of scrapie and could lead to new drugs to prevent vCJD and BSE, medical experts heard during a joint meeting of the European Societies of Clinical and Veterinary Virology and the Society for General Microbiology at the Royal College of Physicians, London. Blocking nerve cells delays onset of prion disease.
 
Virus may contribute to certain psychiatric disorders
Biomaterials : 09 January, 2002
A virus that causes a fatal brain disease in horses and sheep may be linked to certain mental disorders in man, medical experts heard during a joint meeting of the European Societies of Clinical and Veterinary Virology and the Society for General Microbiology at the Royal College of Physicians, London.
 
Predicting the pandemic - staying one step ahead of influenza
Biomaterials : 09 January, 2002
Studies to identify which influenza virus strains are present in pigs and chickens could help scientists to predict the next human pandemic strain and develop new, more effective, vaccines medical experts heard during a joint meeting of the European Societies of Clinical and Veterinary Virology and the Society for General Microbiology at the Royal College of Physicians, London.
 
Putting a stop to antibiotic resistance with new drugs from seaweed
Biomaterials : 07 January, 2002
Scientists have found a new way to prevent life-threatening infections not by killing the bacteria but by preventing them from talking to each other, according to research published today in the journal Microbiology. 'We've found that a group of chemicals called furanones can prevent the build up of communities of bacteria on surfaces such as surgical implants and in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients,' says Dr Michael Givskov of the Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen.
 
Can acne protect against cancer?
Biomaterials : 01 November, 2001
Acne is the scourge of teenagers everywhere, but according to an article published in the November issue of the magazine Microbiology Today the bacteria which cause this disease may protect sufferers from other infections and cancer in later life. Dr Anne Eady of the Skin Research Centre at the University of Leeds says in the article 'there may be advantages to having acne. The presence of propionibacteria on the skin triggers an immune response, which may constitute a first line immune defence system against infections and cancer.'
 
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