Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

A new component of the brain system that regulates body weight

American Association For The Advancement Of Science (AAAS) : 11 July, 2006  (New Product)
According to a report in the Science, scientists have identified a new component of the brain system that regulates body weight. A select population of neurons in the brain's hypothalamus senses changes in the body's fuel availability and, in turn, influences appetite and metabolism.
According to a report in the Science, scientists have identified a new component of the brain system that regulates body weight. A select population of neurons in the brain's hypothalamus senses changes in the body's fuel availability and, in turn, influences appetite and metabolism.

In addition to monitoring levels of carbohydrates and fat, this circuitry also responds to amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, according to Daniela Cota and colleagues. Scientists had previously determined that, outside of the brain, the so-called “mTOR signaling pathway” integrates nutrient signals with hormonal signals to control growth and development. They had also learned that the amino acid leucine increases mTOR signaling.

In this study, when the researchers injected leucine into the brains of rodents, this activated hypothalamic mTOR signaling and decreased food intake and body weight. The authors speculate that imbalances between the fuel-sensing pathways in the brain and the rest of the body may predispose people toward obesity or diabetes. A related “Perspective” discusses the study.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   Â© 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo