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News

Air quality experts announce new air quality guidelines for halogens and hydrogen halides

Defra : 27 February, 2006  (Company News)
Air quality experts have today published new guidelines for halogens and hydrogen halides for protecting human health.
Air quality experts have today published new guidelines for halogens and hydrogen halides for protecting human health.

The Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards has produced guidelines for six substances, bromine, chlorine, hydrogen bromide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen iodide. High concentrations of these substances may lead to irritant effects in sensitive individuals. The guidelines are intended to help protect local populations living around the small number of industrial sites where these chemicals are produced.

Hydrogen halides arise mainly from the burning of fossil fuels, especially the combustion of coal or oil.

Others are created through specific industrial processes, for example, hydrogen fluoride is emitted from some aluminium smelters and ceramic processes and chlorine is released from a range of chemical processes, such as the manufacture of organic chemicals.

The guidelines will be used mainly by pollution control authorities such as the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. These bodies are responsible for regulating controlling the release of these substances from major industrial processes.

More specifically they will be used as part of the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control regime, a holistic regulatory regime used to regulate over 4,000 of the most complex and polluting industries.
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