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News

Building a better Nanoworld with microbes

National Science Foundation : 17 March, 2005  (Company News)
In a new approach to assembling nanotechnology's atomic-scale machines, a team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, has successfully crafted tiny bio-electronic circuits out of live bacteria. Among the potential applications is a new class of sensors that could rapidly detect dangerous biological agents such as anthrax.
In a new approach to assembling nanotechnology's atomic-scale machines, a team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, has successfully crafted tiny bio-electronic circuits out of live bacteria. Among the potential applications is a new class of sensors that could rapidly detect dangerous biological agents such as anthrax.

Carried out in the laboratories of UW chemist Robert Hamers, with funding from the National Science Foundation, the work was reported today at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Diego. The group's formal paper was also posted today in the online edition of the journal Nano Letters; a printed version is scheduled to appear in the journal's April issue.
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