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News

Carbon nanotube 'shock absorbers' excel at dampening vibration

National Science Foundation : 12 January, 2005  (New Product)
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a novel carbon-nanotube-based material that chokes vibration and may have applications for both large and small devices.
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a novel carbon-nanotube-based material that chokes vibration and may have applications for both large and small devices.

Conducted by Nikhil Koratkar and colleagues at Rensselaer, the research arose from Koratkar's National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, which recognizes outstanding scientists and engineers who, early in their careers, show exceptional potential for leadership at the frontiers of knowledge. This award is the highest honor bestowed by NSF on scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers.

'True to the spirit of nanoscale engineering, Koratkar's team developed unique composite materials to maximize frictional damping. Although one may argue that carbon nanotubes are too expensive to use in practical systems, there is no reason why other, less expensive, nanoscale materials cannot be incorporated to accomplish the same task. This is an excellent example of someone taking lemon and turning it into lemonade.' Yip-Wah Chung, Director of the NSF Surface Engineering and Material Design Program

'In most mechanical systems, friction is often considered to be a negative attribute because it results in wear and unnecessary energy dissipation. In this case, professor Koratkar took advantage of friction between sliding interfaces to damp vibrations.' Yip-Wah Chung

Principal Investigator:
Nikhil Koratkar
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
+1 518 276 2630

In the January 9, 2004, advance online edition of Nature Materials, the researchers describe the new material and demonstrate its usefulness as a filler to enhance traditional vibration-reduction materials.
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