Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Climate change and the risk to water supply

CSIRO : 11 May, 2007  (Technical Article)
Science can assist the community to avoid rather than simply understand the potential negative effects of climate change, according to CSIRO Research Fellow, Dr Barrie Pittock
In an address today to the Engineers Australia Water Forum in Brisbane, Dr Pittock, who is the retired leader of the CSIRO Climate Impacts Group, will explore the role scientists play in informing debate over the extent and likely effects of climate change, particularly in regard to water supply.

“Risk management demands that scientists describe and warn about seemingly extreme or alarming possibilities for any given scenario of human behaviour, such as increasing greenhouse gas emissions,” Dr Pittock says.

“That should be the case if those scenarios have even a small probability of occurring.”

He says the principles of the risk-management approach are applied in engineering design (for instance for the safety of dams and bridges) and in military planning (where large resources are devoted to guarding against and deterring threats). They are equally commonplace in insurance.

“The present drying trends in southwestern Australia, and possibly those in southeastern and eastern Australia, are partly attributable to human-induced climate change. They result from warming which is increasing evaporation in catchments, and in some cases, leading to a decreasing trend in rainfall.”

He says measures designed to help communities to cope with reduced water supply, such as water conservation and recycling, are necessary and indeed urgent.

”However, unless the basic cause, globally increasing greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, is dealt with, periods of water shortage will become more frequent and severe.

“The climate system will respond to the present increases in emissions over many decades to come. What we emit now will worsen the situation for decades into the future,” he says.

He says measures designed to help communities to cope with reduced water supply, such as water conservation and recycling, are necessary and indeed urgent.”Increasing levels of greenhouse gas emissions will lead to large impacts on many climate-affected systems, including more frequent water shortages in southern and eastern Australia, that may be very difficult to adapt to in decades to come.”
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   Â© 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo