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News

DARTS helps solve industrial problems

CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory : 01 September, 2005  (New Product)
With support from the Victorian Government's new Industry Synchrotron Access, Cetec, a risk management consulting group, contacted DARTS in order to help solve a manufacturing problem for MtM Pty Ltd, an Australian car exporter. Cetec and Mtm Pty Ltd had already used conventional analyses to determine that the problem lay in the bonding mechanism between the bright-metal-on-plastic components. Results suggested that the bonding process could be improved by modifying several stages of the process, but the distribution of metals and other elements below one part per million could not be determined without the use of a synchrotron radiation source.
With support from the Victorian Government's new Industry Synchrotron Access, Cetec, a risk management consulting group, contacted DARTS in order to help solve a manufacturing problem for MtM Pty Ltd, an Australian car exporter.

Cetec and Mtm Pty Ltd had already used conventional analyses to determine that the problem lay in the bonding mechanism between the bright-metal-on-plastic components. Results suggested that the bonding process could be improved by modifying several stages of the process, but the distribution of metals and other elements below one part per million could not be determined without the use of a synchrotron radiation source.

Using high-intensity x-ray fluorescence, accessed through DARTS at Daresbury's Synchrotron Radiation Source, scientists were able to examine the BMOP components in more detail. Results confirmed that the weak adhesion was associated with low levels and uneven distribution of particular metal atoms; a vital link in understanding the way in which chemical treatments affected the final product.

Australia's BMOP components are worth about $20 million a year which means that discarded automotive components cost money! This example clearly illustrates how DARTS can help solve industrial problems, increase productivity as well as ensuring exacting quality standards.

For further details please access the case study which is available at the Australian Synchrotron website
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