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News

Form, color & function at ThyssenKrupp Stahl in Duisburg-Beeckerwerth

ThyssenKrupp Steel : 10 October, 2002  (Company News)
Europe's largest solar power project has started operation in Duisburg-Beeckerwerth: as part of a fourmonth modernization, ThyssenKrupp Stahl has given its hot strip slitting facility an attractive new look with a steel facade designed by Essen-based architects Czerny-Gunia in a color scheme by Friedrich Ernst von Garnier.
Europe's largest solar power project has started operation in Duisburg-Beeckerwerth: as part of a fourmonth modernization, ThyssenKrupp Stahl has given its hot strip slitting facility an attractive new look with a steel facade designed by Essen-based architects Czerny-Gunia in a color scheme by Friedrich Ernst von Garnier. Integrated in the green shades of the sheet metal is a wave-like pattern of solar modules colored dark-blue to violet. The photovoltaic system on the facade of the hot strip slitting line was officially switched on in a ceremony on Thursday, October 10, 2002.

Installed over an area of 1,400 square meters, the 50 kilowatt peak Solartec system produces electricity in the form of direct current which is then converted into alternating current and fed into the grid of utility RWE. The system is expected to produce approximately 25,000 to 30,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year.

'Despite the fact that the angle to the sun is not ideal, the system's photovoltaic modules achieve high performance values,' says Ullrich Finger, managing director of ThyssenKrupp Bausysteme, Dinslaken, the company that makes the solar modules and a subsidiary of ThyssenKrupp Stahl. 'This is due to the use of three-layer technology, which makes the solar cells less dependent on the angle of incidence of the sun's rays.' The use of nanocrystalline silicon delivers the decisive advantage, according to Finger: the elements produce high yields even under cloudy skies or in fog, partial shade or summer heat. As a result they generate on average roughly 20 percent more power than conventional crystalline modules, which additionally have to be erected on the roof or in front of the facade.

'With this successful symbiosis of steel and solar technology, ThyssenKrupp Stahl has pioneered the use of photovoltaics as an alternative energy form offering great quantitative potential,' said ThyssenKrupp Stahl Executive Board Member, Dr. Jost A. Massenberg, at the switch-on on October 10, 2002. 'The large surfaces it requires are available on industrial and commercial buildings, while steel, combined with flexible thin-film solar modules, provides the suitable building element.'
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