Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Hot-headed men headed for heart trouble

Duke University Pratt School Of Engineering : 14 January, 2007  (Technical Article)
According to a new study, men who regularly lose their temper face a significantly higher risk of developing a heart condition that can lead to a fatal stroke. An anger management expert discusses the implications of this research . . .
According to a new study, men who regularly lose their temper face a significantly higher risk of developing a heart condition that can lead to a fatal stroke. An anger management expert discusses the implications of this research . . .

Here's some advice for men with hot tempers: Don't get mad, get healthy. A new study reports that men who chronically lose their temper face a far higher risk of developing a serious cardiac condition called atrial fibrillation. Redford Williams is director of the Behavioral Medicine Research Center at Duke University Medical Center and an expert on anger management. 'What we have here now, really for the first time, is a study that's finding a higher risk of a potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmia. It's yet another piece of evidence that being angry is bad for you.' Williams says the study helps dispel the notion that always letting your anger out is healthy. 'This is one of those myths that exist about anger, that if you've got a lot of anger, you should let it out, get rid of it. It's equally bad to bottle it up. Both of these myths are wrong.' There is a long list of negative health consequences from anger, says Williams, and learning effective anger management techniques can help reduce many of them. 'It would be a good idea to begin to teach people the skills they need to manage anger better.' I'm Cabell Smith for MedMinute.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo