Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Magnetic glue found in superconductors

University Of Bristol : 12 April, 2007  (Technical Article)
A breakthrough has been made by a team of scientists, led by Professor Stephen Hayden from the University of Bristol, in understanding how high temperature superconductors work. Their results, announced today in Nature, suggest they have found the
High temperature superconductors are ceramic materials that can conduct electricity across huge distances without losing any energy. They are relatively cheap to make and have enormous potential in many areas of technology, but there is still controversy over what actually causes the superconductivity.

The structure of superconductors consists of many layers of atoms stacked on top of each other. Electrons easily move along the different layers, but rarely across them. Superconductivity occurs when electrons in the metal atoms pair up to form so-called “Cooper pairs”. They do this when there is an attraction or ‘glue’ that can hold them together. Formation of these Cooper pairs results in superconductivity, but what holds the pairs together?

Professor Hayden said: ‘Our results suggest that the glue may be due to the very weak magnetism of the electrons in the copper atoms of the superconductor. Thus the Cooper pairs are bound together by a sort of magnetic glue.’

The team from the University of Bristol (UK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (US), observed evidence of what might be the binding glue using MAPS, the latest spectrometer at the ISIS facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire (UK).

This discovery will enhance our fundamental understanding of superconductivity. It is currently used in applications such as satellite and mobile phone transmission, and has enormous potential in a wide range of other technologies.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   Â© 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo