Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Making better probiotics, a helping hand for friendly bacteria

Society For General Microbiology : 16 June, 2006  (New Product)
Asthma, eczema, bowel disease and other medical problems, which can be helped by taking probiotics, foods containing friendly bacteria, may be improved even further according to research announced at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.
Asthma, eczema, bowel disease and other medical problems, which can be helped by taking probiotics, foods containing friendly bacteria, may be improved even further according to research announced at the Society for General Microbiology's 158th Meeting at the University of Warwick, UK.

The market for milk-based products containing friendly bacteria, called probiotics, has increased explosively over the last few years. Live yoghurts have moved out of specialist health food stores and into our mainstream supermarkets, and other similar foods are following.

'The problem is that the friendly bacteria have a limited activity in all these products,' says Nedal Swidan, a researcher at the University of Wales Institute in Cardiff. 'To be effective the bacteria have to survive passing through our stomach in sufficient numbers to have their beneficial effects. So we looked at ways to enhance the growth and survival of probiotic bacteria by pre-treating the milk'.

The scientists treated skimmed milk with a food enzyme called trypsin that can cut up the proteins in milk into smaller units, which are easier for bacteria to use as food. The researchers showed that they could reduce the time taken by the bacterium Bifidobacterium lactis to start growing by a staggering 70% and the enzyme treatment also increased the rate of growth of the bacteria.

'If we can enhance the growth of these friendly bacteria on a commercial scale then we could start seeing health improvements,' says Nedal Swidan. 'The presence of these bacteria in the gut has been shown to prevent problems including diarrhoea and bowel disease. Probiotic bacteria are also thought to boost our immune system and this may help in some related conditions such as eczema and asthma'.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo