Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

New broadband wireless communication technologies developed for commercial applications

Delft University Of Technology : 20 November, 2006  (Technical Article)
The novel low-noise amplifier for ultrabroadband communications designed in CMOS technology won the
The novel low-noise amplifier for ultrabroadband communications designed in CMOS technology won the ‘Best Student Paper Award’ at the 2006 IEEE RFIC Symposium in San Francisco. The awarded paper, titled “A 1.2V Reactive-Feedback 3.1-10.6GHz Ultrawideband Low-Noise Amplifier in 0.13μm CMOS”, is co-authored by PhD student Michael Reiha, M.Sc. and Prof. dr. John Long of the Electronics Research Laboratory/DIMES, in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science at TU Delft. This year’s symposium exhibited over 125 papers from top research centres, 70 of which were eligible for the award.

Broadband wireless communication technologies currently being developed for commercial applications, such as multi-band and multi-standard radio, software-defined and adaptive radio, and ultrawideband radio, promise data transfer speeds up to 1Gb/s. The UWB amplifier developed by the Delft researchers is a key link that allows laptop computers, digital cameras, and other electronic appliances to exchange data at such high speeds. In addition to speed, UWB offers the promise of using less battery power than conventional wireless technologies such as Bluetooth or 802.11. It is also a strong contender in wireless sensing, which is an enabling technology in numerous health, transport and security applications.

One difficulty in the design of wideband amplifiers for UWB systems is operating from a single battery with low current consumption, while amplifying signals from 3.1-10.6GHz with minimal degradation in quality. The amplifier developed by Reiha and Long in Delft, and manufactured by IBM Microelectronics, pioneers the use of on-chip transformers in a commercial CMOS technology, the same technology used to build personal computers and most other portable electronic equipment. The integrated transformer allows the amplifier to operate at just 1.2V, consuming only 9mW of power and occupying less than 1mm2 of area while still meeting the tough design specifications set for UWB communication. Integration of the circuit in CMOS technology is yet another step towards the eventual integration of wireless and computing technology onto the same IC, a dream of microelectronic researchers since the mid-1980s.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   Â© 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo