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News

Nylon 46 sensors outdo stainless steel on cost and performance

DSM Engineering Plastics (Sittard) : 04 March, 2004  (Application Story)
Wabash Technologies, a leading manufacturer of a broad range of vital electronic/electromechanical components for original equipment manufacturers, has developed a new threaded powertrain sensor using Stanyl from DSM Engineering Plastics.
Wabash Technologies, a leading manufacturer of a broad range of vital electronic/electromechanical components for original equipment manufacturers, has developed a new threaded powertrain sensor using Stanyl from DSM Engineering Plastics.

The new sensors replace an older stainless steel design and provide Wabash customers with cost savings and performance improvements.

“These sensors offer our customers significant advantages that are a direct result of the unique properties of Stanyl” reports Joe Haupert of Wabash. “We were very pleased with the result that came about after a lot of hard work on our part as well as DSM’s.”

One of the biggest initial cost savings was gleaned from the fact that the plastic could be injection moulded in one fast step, while the metal version required starting with a stainless steel near-net shape and then machining that shape into the final component. So not only does Stanyl reduce raw material costs, but it also allows for savings on processing costs.

In terms of performance, the Stanyl sensors perfected by Wabash retain the clamping force experienced by the sensor when the flange pushes down on the O-ring. This retention or resistance to creep is actually better than the stainless steel part, and the Stanyl part also stays tight and doesn’t leak the way some metal designs can. Stanyl balances high tensile strength, high shear modulus and toughness that easily withstand the torque forces during installation.

The sensors are exposed to a very harsh environment of high temperatures up to 160C (320F), as well as harsh chemicals such as ATF, engine oil and fuels. Heat-ageing tests conducted by DSM show conclusively that these properties remain in place over the life cycle of the sensors.
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