Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Older, chronically ill patients may not be prepared to receive prognosis

Yale University : 04 November, 2003  (New Product)
Despite previous reports concluding that patients want full disclosure about their illness, many seriously ill older persons and caregivers may not be ready or able to receive information such as life expectancy, research at Yale shows.
Published in the October issue of Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the study of 214 elderly patients with serious chronic illness found that patients and caregivers frequently disagree with their physicians about whether the likely outcome of their illness has been discussed.

'Although physicians have often been blamed for poor communication skills, this study found that many patients do not want prognostic information, raising the question of whether they are ready and/or able to hear what the physician may be telling them,' said Terri R. Fried M.D., associate professor of internal medicine/geriatrics at Yale School of Medicine.

Previous studies have found that many seriously ill patients are overly optimistic about their prognosis. While poor physician communication skills have received much attention as a possible cause, there has been little simultaneous examination of what physicians said and what patients hear.

The study subjects had advanced cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or congestive heart failure. They were asked a) if their physician had told them they could die of their illness (discussed prognosis) and b) if their physician had told them how long they had to live (discussed life-expectancy). Their caregivers and physicians were asked a parallel series of questions. Patients and caregivers were also asked whether they wanted to discuss life expectancy.

After conversations, in which clinicians reported that prognosis was discussed, 69 percent of patients and 62 percent of caregivers reported that there was no discussion of prognosis. In addition, after conversations, in which clinicians reported that life expectancy was discussed, 89 percent of patients and 82 percent of caregivers reported that there was no discussion of life expectancy. Of the patients and caregivers who reported that no life expectancy conversation occurred, 40 percent of the patients and 23 percent of the caregivers did not want to have a conversation on the topic.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo