Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Pneumonia in transplant patients can be avoided

Society For General Microbiology : 10 April, 2002  (Company News)
Life-threatening pneumonia in bone marrow transplant patients can be controlled using a strategy called pre-emptive therapy, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.
Life-threatening pneumonia in bone marrow transplant patients can be controlled using a strategy called pre-emptive therapy, scientists heard at the spring meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Warwick.

'We have found that early diagnosis and treatment of colds and flu in transplant and immunocompromised patients can reduce the risk of pneumonia. But pre-emptive therapy is not just a question of providing drugs to patients. This research has highlighted the need for strict infection control measures to be put in place,' says Dr Anna Maria Geretti of King's College Hospital, London.

Dr Geretti explains, 'Hospitals need to set up surveillance programmes within BMT units based on prompt recognition of symptoms and rapid viral diagnostic methods. Health care workers should receive the flu vaccine, and we may have to restrict access to family members and visitors even if they have only minor symptoms such as a runny nose.'

Respiratory viruses may affect nearly 50% of high-risk patients during winter months. Influenza, Parainfluenza and Respiratory Syncytical Viruses are common. In these patients infections can spread from the upper respiratory tract to the lungs causing life-threatening pneumonia. Available treatments do not show any benefit once severe pneumonia has developed.

Dr Geretti says, 'Raising awareness of the potential severity of viral respiratory infections may reduce the number of deaths in high-risk patients. BMT and AIDS patients with respiratory infections may also benefit from several new antiviral drugs, such as neuraminidase inhibitors.'
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo