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News

Polyurethane Coatings Provide Opportunities for the Future

Bayer MaterialScience AG : 02 August, 2001  (Company News)
'Future developments by the coatings industry and its raw materials suppliers will be driven by three factors: quality, efficiency and environmental protection.' That is how Bernd Steinhilber, Head of the Industrial Coatings Business Unit in the Coatings and Colorants Business Group of Bayer AG, characterizes the perspectives of the coatings business worldwide.
For a global raw materials supplier such as Bayer, quality encompasses many different aspects in the development of close customer relations: from global product availability to customer support on a regional or even local level. The aim of all efforts is always to provide fast, reliable and competent support. In pursuing this aim, the use of communications tools such as the Internet and e-business are becoming increasingly important.

Of course, successful operation in the global market is impossible without forward- looking technological perspectives and visions. Polyurethane technology opens new and promising options for the joint coating of metal car bodies and plastic add-on components in automotive OEM finishing. Known as in-line coating, this process is interesting above all in terms of the potential time and cost savings because the primer surfacer, basecoat and topcoat can be applied wet-on-wet-on-wet and then baked together at temperatures below 100 degrees Celsius.

A further example is the curing of paint films by a two-step process combining UV curing and conventional thermal drying (dual-cure). The main benefit is that the known problems of UV mono-cure - such as shrinkage and incomplete curing on objects with complex geometry - are prevented.
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