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News

Qualified repair system for aircraft honeycomb structures

Huntsman Advanced Materials (Duxford) : 01 February, 2013  (New Product)
Huntsman Advanced Materials' Epocast 52 A/B is claimed to be the first repair system to achieve qualification in accordance with the Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee’s (CACRC) AMS 2980 standard for the structural repair of carbon epoxy airframe components.

The CACRC aims to develop methods and procedures for the repair of composite structures on civil aircraft structures. The organization involves members from airframe manufacturers, airline users, material manufacturers and aviation authorities. CACRC and the OEMs are responsible for the qualification of repair materials.

Following an extensive testing procedure, which was witnessed by Airbus, Boeing and the FAA, the CACRC has qualified Epocast 52 A/B as a structural repair material for carbon-epoxy components to be processed by wet-layup (vacuum bagging). Wet-layup is often the preferred process for repair due to the simplicity of storage offered and the use of two component resin and dry fibres.

Epocast 52 A/B combines low temperature vacuum bag curing with excellent hot/wet performance (service temperature up to 177C). This system is also qualified to BMS 8-301, Class 1, Grade 2; AIMS 08-01-002-01 and AIMS 08-02-002-01.

Philippe Christou, Head of European Technical Support, Huntsman Advanced Materials said, “A repair has to restore a damaged structure to its original state. It has to be airworthy, durable, damage tolerant and capable of exceeding the life of the aircraft. As the use of composites in airframe structures increases, repair methods and their standardization assume upmost importance.”

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