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News

Salt spices up theater show

Akcros Chemicals : 13 October, 2004  (New Product)
Sceneography student Pepijn Rozing had a dilemma. He was designing a theater production based on Richard Wagner's opera The Flying Dutchman and wanted to symbolize the sea in an unconventional but eye-catching way.
Sceneography student Pepijn Rozing had a dilemma. He was designing a theater production based on Richard Wagner's opera The Flying Dutchman and wanted to symbolize the sea in an unconventional but eye-catching way.

Armed with very little budget, after consulting fellow student Eddy van der Laan, he hit upon the idea of an evaporated sea, which would mean covering the performance area in salt. Lots of salt.

But where was the Dutch student going to get his hands on the thousands of kilos he'd need?

One phone call to Akzo Nobel later, the 24-year-old, who is in his final year of studies in Utrecht, the Netherlands, had managed to secure delivery of a 20,000 kilo contribution, courtesy of Akzo Nobel Salt's site in Hengelo.

'The salt found in the ground around Hengelo used to be part of an inland sea around 200 million years ago,' explained Heleen van de Lustgraaf, communication manager for Akzo Nobel Salt. 'We thought it would be a great idea to bring this 'sea' to the students' imaginative production of The Flying Dutchman.

So the salt was delivered in 25kg sacks to the Amsterdam venue (a converted factory), where ten volunteers spent more than six hours emptying the contents onto the large sloping stage, creating a layer six centimeters deep.
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