Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

SIEMENS VDO Pioneers automotive use of Stanyl PA46 from DSM for e-motor end-laminate in new ABS pump

DSM Coating Resins : 15 May, 2006  (New Product)
Stanyl polyamide 46 (PA46), often used in non-automotive e-motor end-laminates thanks to its thin-wall strength and heat resistance, finds its first in-car use in an anti-blocking system pump motor by Siemens VDO. In the compact, newly designed e-motor, Stanyl resin enables a 0.4-0.6 mm, ultra-thin-wall design that maximizes both the laminate size and the number of wire windings. It provides a cost-effective way to optimize the motor assembly process while insulating the wire windings electrically from the metal rotor armature. The Stanyl end-laminate retains working rigidity and dimensional stability up to 290
Stanyl polyamide 46 (PA46), often used in non-automotive e-motor end-laminates thanks to its thin-wall strength and heat resistance, finds its first in-car use in an anti-blocking system pump motor by Siemens VDO. In the compact, newly designed e-motor, Stanyl resin enables a 0.4-0.6 mm, ultra-thin-wall design that maximizes both the laminate size and the number of wire windings. It provides a cost-effective way to optimize the motor assembly process while insulating the wire windings electrically from the metal rotor armature. The Stanyl end-laminate retains working rigidity and dimensional stability up to 290 C, higher than most thermoplastics subjected to wire winding tension load.

In direct current e-motors, wire windings around metal rotor induce a magnetic flux. This energy causes the motor armature to rotate within an encompassing magnetic field, usually provided by permanent magnets around the armature. Relatively speaking, Stanyl allows either thinner end-laminates, which result in a more stable winding process, or larger e-motor sizes suited for cost-effective usage of end-laminates. Ultra-thin end-laminates, which position and insulate the wires using the smallest possible volume, help reduce assembly and system costs due to the excellent toughness and flow of the material.

'Stanyl resins have been used extensively in e-motors outside of automotive, but Siemens VDO is providing the first purely in-car application,' said Richard Frissen, ADTS Manager Automotive for DSM Engineering Plastics. 'When Siemens VDO engineers began the search for the right material, they were aware of Stanyl's suitability for high heat applications as a result of the company's longstanding collaborative relationship with DSM. Together we were able to design the right end-laminate for this need, one that provides a good balance of economics and rigorous functionality.'

Used in a broad range of demanding applications in automotive, electrical, construction and other industries, Stanyl exhibits strength and stability at high heat, plus good surface finish, chemical resistance, and resistance to aging and deformation.

Stanyl is offered in a wide variety of grades including high flow, abrasion-resistant, and unfilled (non-reinforced), as well as grades containing glass fiber, minerals, lubricants, impact modifiers or flame-retardants. Its higher crystallinity and a faster rate of crystallization provides a technical edge over other engineering plastics, including PA6 and 66, polyesters, semi-aromatic polyamides, PPS and LCPs. Compared to these, Stanyl grades show better heat resistance, mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, wear and friction behavior and (with faster cycle-time and increased flow) improved processing economics.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo