Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Advanced Composites
LeftNav
Aerospace
LeftNav
Amorphous Metal Structures
LeftNav
Analysis and Simulation
LeftNav
Asbestos and Substitutes
LeftNav
Associations, Research Organisations and Universities
LeftNav
Automation Equipment
LeftNav
Automotive
LeftNav
Biomaterials
LeftNav
Building Materials
LeftNav
Bulk Handling and Storage
LeftNav
CFCs and Substitutes
LeftNav
Company
LeftNav
Components
LeftNav
Consultancy
LeftNav
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File
New Materials
Pro Health Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Pro Security Zone
Web Lec
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Yale data analysis shows birth defects resulting from Vietnam Veterans' exposure to agent orange

Yale University : 25 August, 2003  (New Product)
Yale researchers have found evidence of a connection between Vietnam veterans' exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange in Southeast Asia and the occurrence of birth defects and developmental disabilities in their children.
Yale researchers have found evidence of a connection between Vietnam veterans' exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange in Southeast Asia and the occurrence of birth defects and developmental disabilities in their children.

Using data that only was made available to the public about two years ago, George Knafl, associate research scientist and statistician at Yale School of Nursing, said in presenting his findings today at the conference, Dioxin 2003, in Boston, that his results differ from those of the U.S. Air Force because he employed more powerful modeling and analysis techniques.

The Air Force Health Study in 1992 concluded there was no association between exposure to dioxin, which was the toxic contaminant in Agent Orange, and reproductive outcomes.

'Results for composite categories suggest that the children of Vietnam veterans constitute a likely vulnerable population as a consequence of their fathers' potential Vietnam service dioxin exposure,' said Knafl in his talk at the Westin-Copley Hotel and Conference Center.

The co-author of the study, Linda Schwartz, a research scientist at the Yale School of Nursing, said currently the Veterans Administration provides compensation and assistance to children with birth defects born to women who served in Vietnam.

'It is our hope that this analysis will reopen the discussion about the VA assisting children with birth defects born to the men who served in Vietnam,' she said. The VA only recognizes spina bifida, a congenital defect of the vertebra, as a compensable outcome of dioxin exposure to men who served in Vietnam.

Knafl said his statistical analyses were conducted over two years and addressed personnel responsible for herbicide handling and spraying in Vietnam, a military campaign known as 'Operation Ranch Hand,' along with a comparison group of other Air Force Vietnam veterans.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 NewMaterials.com
Netgains Logo