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National Laboratory
Functional Materials get UK research financial boost
National Laboratory : 28 December, 2014
Ten new research projects that will advance UK manufacturing capability, develop new and exciting functional materials, and accelerate the translation of the science of functional materials through to application were announced today by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), valued in total at £20 million.
 
Conflict minerals - moving beyond compliance
National Laboratory : 03 July, 2014
Certain minerals originating in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries have been a major source of international concern. Armed groups in the region are accused of severe human rights abuses and of using proceeds from the sales of these minerals to fuel regional conflicts. A broad range of public, private, and civil society groups have been working to bring light to this issue and, in recent years, legislation has been passed to address this problem. Bureau Veritas, in partnership with Estelle Levin Ltd. (ELL), offers public training to issuer and non-issuer manufacturers, suppliers, and vendors to educate them on conflict minerals regulations and to present the solutions available to address their challenges and build capacity for action.
 
Worldwide ban on HBCD flame retardant decreed at UN Conference
National Laboratory : 16 September, 2013
That the flame retardant HBCD may no longer be produced or used was decided by representatives from over 160 countries in late May at a UN conference on chemicals in Geneva. Empa's extensive research on HBCD, formerly used as a flame retardant for plastics, electronics and textiles, and especially for insulation panels in buildings, contributed to the new regulation of HBCD under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs).
 
UK Minister for Universities and Science announces £85 million research capital fund
National Laboratory : 03 April, 2013
The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is to invite capital bids against an £85 million fund to increase the strength and productivity of the research base within three technologies: * Advanced Materials (£30 million) * Grid-scale Energy Storage (£30 million) * Robotics & Autonomous Systems (£25 million)
 
Energy Innovation Hub to tackle US rare earth materials shortages
National Laboratory : 13 February, 2013
The US Department of Energy has announced that a team led by Ames Laboratory has been awarded up to $120 million over five years to establish an Energy Innovation Hub that will develop solutions to the domestic shortages of rare earth metals and other materials critical for US energy security. The new research centre, to be named the Critical Materials Institute (CMI), will bring together leading researchers from academia, four Department of Energy national laboratories, and the private sector.
 
Quantum cryptography enhanced by new technologies
National Laboratory : 10 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, in collaboration with researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colo., and Albion College, in Albion, Mich., have achieved quantum key distribution at telecommunications industry wavelengths in a 50-kilometer (31 mile) optical fiber. The work could accelerate the development of QKD for secure communications in optical fibers at distances beyond current technological limits.
 
New method for using a laser beam to accelerate ions developed
National Laboratory : 10 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Nevada, Reno, Ludwig-Maximilian-University in Germany, and the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics in Germany, have developed a new method for using a laser beam to accelerate ions. The novel method may enable important advances in compact ion accelerators, medical physics and inertial confinement fusion.
 
New method for studying ion channel kinetics proposed
National Laboratory : 10 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for the study of ion channel gating kinetics. An ion channel is a protein pore that lets ions (charged atoms such as calcium) pass through a cell's membrane. The method fits data to a new class of models, called manifest interconductance rank models, which will give researchers a better understanding of the mechanisms by which ion channels open and close.
 
Fragments of cosmic rays find potential role in homeland security
National Laboratory : 09 June, 2007
Cosmic particles could someday lead to the detection of smuggled nuclear materials, according to researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In a paper appearing in Nature magazine, (vol. 422, p. 277), a team of Los Alamos National Laboratory astrophysicists and physicists notes that in both laboratory experiments and corresponding computer simulations, dense materials such as uranium can be detected and imaged by tracking the paths of muons as they pass through the target materials.
 
Creating fusion energy in a soda can
National Laboratory : 09 June, 2007
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, N.M., are investigating a way to create fusion energy in a cylinder roughly the size of a soda can.
 
Researchers demonstrate ultra-secure, long-distance quantum key distribution
National Laboratory : 09 June, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have demonstrated unconditionally secure quantum key distribution over a record-setting 107 kilometers of optical fiber. The work is a significant step towards enabling communication with an unprecedented level of security over long distances of optical fiber.
 
Los Alamos high-temperature superconducting tape licensed
National Laboratory : 08 June, 2007
Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has licensed patents and applications related to its technology for manufacturing high-temperature superconducting tape to IGC-SuperPower of Latham, N.Y., a wholly owned subsidiary of Intermagnetics General Corp.
 
Muon detector could thwart nuclear smugglers
National Laboratory : 08 June, 2007
Trillions of cosmic rays that constantly bombard Earth could help catch smugglers trying to bring nuclear weapons or materials into the United States. Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a detector that can see through lead or other heavy shielding in truck trailers or cargo containers to detect uranium, plutonium or other dense materials.
 
Los Alamos National Laboratory device saves millions on nuclear waste assay
National Laboratory : 08 June, 2007
A Los Alamos National Laboratory device that measures radioactive wastes will save the U. S. Department of Energy and its subcontractors about $4 million a year when it is installed this month at DOE's Y-12 Plant at Oak Ridge, TN.
 
Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide electrical characterization for novel energy project
National Laboratory : 07 June, 2007
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory will be providing special electrical characterization of components used in the first high temperature superconducting transformer installed in a U.S. electric utility network, as partners in a project that could improve the way electrical energy is delivered in America.
 
Los Alamos National Laboratory's Atlas machine begins experimental work
National Laboratory : 07 June, 2007
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory performed the first liner implosion shot on the Atlas pulsed power facility recently. This successful experiment demonstrated that the Atlas facility is ready to support the Laboratory's research work relating to the certification of the nuclear weapons stockpile.
 
Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher presents bright idea
National Laboratory : 07 June, 2007
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory are exploring methods for creating more electrically efficient organic light-emitting diodes, technology that could be used to create energy-efficient panels of light for use in buildings or homes.
 
Los Alamos National Laboratory advances the art and science of aerogels
National Laboratory : 06 June, 2007
University of California researchers working at Los Alamos National Laboratory have recently demonstrated a novel method for chemically modifying and enhancing silica-based aerogels without sacrificing the aerogels unique properties. Aerogels are low-density, transparent materials used in a wide range of applications, including thermal insulation, porous separation media, inertial confinement fusion experiments and cometary dust capture agents.
 
Scientists explore complex nature of superconductivity
National Laboratory : 06 June, 2007
Researchers from the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory believe they have discovered evidence to support leading theories about the underlying mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Through research in high magnetic fields, they hope to have made one more step toward a complete understanding of this complex phenomenon.
 
Researchers from US and Russia develop process for making pure titanium medical implants
National Laboratory : 06 June, 2007
Scientists from the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Ufa State Aviation Technical University in Russia have developed a process for making strong, lightweight and corrosion-resistant medical implant material from pure titanium.
 
World record length carbon nanotube
National Laboratory : 05 June, 2007
Chemists from Duke University in collaboration with University of California scientists working at Los Alamos National Laboratory have recently grown a world record-length four-centimeter-long, single-wall carbon nanotube.
 
Superconducting coated conductors in magnetic field environments
National Laboratory : 05 June, 2007
Scientists at University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory with a researcher from the University of Cambridge have demonstrated a simple and industrially scaleable method for improving the current densities of superconducting coated conductors in magnetic field environments.
 
Studying the noisy nature of atoms
National Laboratory : 05 June, 2007
Scientists at University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a way to use the random fluctuations that exist naturally in all magnetic systems to perform magnetic resonance studies without disturbing the system's natural state.
 
Putting the squeeze on electron spins
National Laboratory : 04 June, 2007
Scientists at University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory have found a novel method for controlling and measuring electron spins in semiconductor crystals of GaAs (gallium arsenide). The work suggests an alternative, and perhaps even better, way of spin manipulation for future generations of 'semiconductor spintronic' devices.
 
Scientists bridge superconductivity gap
National Laboratory : 04 June, 2007
Researchers at University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory working with a researcher from Chonnam National University in South Korea have discovered that magnetic fluctuations appear to be responsible for superconductivity in a compound called plutonium-cobalt-pentagallium.
 
Atomic mysteries of ancient pigment explored by scientists
National Laboratory : 04 June, 2007
Scientists from the University of California's National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, working with colleagues from Tokyo Metropolitan University, the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina, the National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics in Estonia, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida and the University of Tokyo, have found an ideal candidate for Bose-Einstein condensation in the ancient Chinese pigment, Han Purple.
 
First map of ice on Mars
National Laboratory : 03 June, 2007
Bill Feldman, a Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist, says lurking just beneath the surface of Mars is enough water to cover the entire planet ankle-deep. Feldman released the first global map of hydrogen distribution identified by instruments aboard NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft and offered initial minimum estimates of the total amount of water stored near the Martian surface. His presentation came at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver.
 
Neutralizing the world's most deadly killers
National Laboratory : 03 June, 2007
The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a method for neutralizing some of the world's most deadly killers, chemical and biological warfare agents. Using a newly developed Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet, workers can quickly decontaminate areas tainted with chemical or biological weapons. The process uses electrically charged helium and oxygen gas to create a chemically reactive spray that destroys killer agents on contact.
 
Hidden magnetism in superconductivity
National Laboratory : 03 June, 2007
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered, while studying a compound made of the elements cerium- rhodium-indium, that a magnetic state can coexist with superconductivity in a specific temperature and pressure range.
 
Geologist studies environment of prehistoric man
National Laboratory : 02 June, 2007
In the Afar Rift system of Ethiopia, a new species of human ancestor has been discovered and a geologist from the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory played a significant role in determining the geology of the 2.5-million-year-old fossil and its environmental setting.
 
Concrete made stronger and tougher with bone-shaped wires
National Laboratory : 02 June, 2007
Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have discovered that enlarging the ends of small wires mixed into concrete substantially increases the material's overall strength and toughness. The Los Alamos team found that adding the unique steel wires in amounts equal to just one percent of the concrete's volume increases its maximum strength by as much as 84 percent, and its toughness by as many as 93 times.
 
Solitary vibrations in uranium observed by scientists
National Laboratory : 02 June, 2007
Scientists in Los Alamos have recently observed experimental evidence of solitary vibrations (solitons) in a solid. First observed as localized waves on the surface of water more than a century ago, the concept of solitons in solids was only theorized as possible two decades ago.
 
Los Alamos releases new maps of Mars water
National Laboratory : 31 May, 2007
'Breathtaking' new maps of likely sites of water on Mars showcase their association with geologic features such as Vallis Marineris, the largest canyon in the solar system.
 
Lab microdrilling technology can cut cost of oil exploration
National Laboratory : 31 May, 2007
A microdrilling technology developed by the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory could fundamentally change the face of oil and gas exploration, a multi-billion-dollar a year global industry.
 
Los Alamos partners with CNT Technologies to commercialize SuperThread(tm) carbon-nanotube fiber
National Laboratory : 31 May, 2007
Los Alamos National Laboratory has licensed its carbon nanotube technology to a new commercial partner, Seattle-based CNT Technologies Inc. The ultrastrong, lightweight carbon-nanotube fiber, branded SuperThread(tm) by the company, can have better properties than steel for many applications and could soon be the primary substance from which airplanes, automobile parts, and sports equipment are made. Initial tests show that SuperThread is pound for pound (for the same weight) one-hundred times stronger than steel and less than one-fortieth the weight.
 
Vast nitrogen reserves hidden beneath desert soils
National Laboratory : 30 May, 2007
A University of California scientist working at Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, the University of Nevada, the University of Arkansas and Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nev., has recently found evidence that there may be significantly more amounts of nitrogen, in the form of nitrates, than previously estimated in desert landscapes.
 
Superdiamonds? Scientists discover superconductivity in diamond
National Laboratory : 30 May, 2007
Scientists working at the Russian Academy of Sciences and Los Alamos National Laboratory announced today the discovery of superconductivity at ultracold temperatures in cubic diamond. The discovery offers the potential for a new generation of diamond-based device applications and even suggests that superconductivity in silicon or germanium, which also forms in the diamond structure, may be possible.
 
Los Alamos Pulsed Field Facility achieves world record magnetic field in 100-tesla quest
National Laboratory : 30 May, 2007
Scientists at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory's Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory have set a pair of world records for nondestructive pulsed-magnet performance that puts them in position to deliver a magnet capable of achieving 100 tesla, the longstanding goal of magnet designers and researchers around the globe.
 
Desert varnish shines as environmental monitoring tool
National Laboratory : 29 May, 2007
A University of California researcher working at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in collaboration with earth scientists from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Eastern Washington University, has discovered that desert varnish, a thin brownish to black coating that forms naturally on rock surfaces in deserts and other arid places all over the world, may be an ideal passive environmental monitor for atmospherically-deposited heavy and potentially toxic metals, including radionuclides.',
 
Los Alamos unleashes GENIE on Cerro Grande destruction
National Laboratory : 29 May, 2007
The U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory is using a sophisticated image analysis technology to create high-resolution maps of the destruction caused by the Cerro Grande wildfire.
 
Replacing platinum with non-precious metal composite could reduce cost of hydrogen fuel cells
National Laboratory : 29 May, 2007
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a new class of hydrogen fuel-cell catalysts that exhibit promising activity and stability. The catalysts are made of low-cost nonprecious metals entrapped in something called a heteroatomic-polymer structure, instead of platinum materials typically used in fuel cells.
 
Dry rock goes supercritical
National Laboratory : 28 May, 2007
By proposing a method for using carbon dioxide under high pressure to extract energy from geothermal reservoirs, a University of California scientist working at Los Alamos National Laboratory has put a new twist on a historic Laboratory project. The proposed invention has the potential to take global geothermal energy science in new and exciting directions.
 
Los Alamos Volcanologist: apply lessons from meteorology
National Laboratory : 28 May, 2007
Reducing the danger posed by volcanoes will require volcanologists to integrate data from throughout volcanology to build predictive simulations and models, according to Greg Valentine, a volcanologist at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory.
 
One-of-a-kind magnet open for science
National Laboratory : 28 May, 2007
The world's most powerful pulsed, nondestructive magnet is now ready to explore the frontiers of high magnetic field science, after 10 years of research, major instrument development, and construction.
 
Los Alamos instrument yields new knowledge of Saturn's rings
National Laboratory : 27 May, 2007
University of California scientists working at Los Alamos National Laboratory have begun to analyze data from an instrument aboard the joint U.S.-European spacecraft Cassini. Although Cassini has only been orbiting the planet Saturn since July 1, data from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer has already begun to provide new information about the curious nature of Saturn's space environment.
 
Telling a salty tale of martian water
National Laboratory : 27 May, 2007
University of California scientists working at Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with a scientist from Indiana University have devised a method for determining whether sulfate salts can account for evidence of water on Mars. The work could pave the way to a better understanding of the martian environment and the history of water on Mars.
 
Scientists study carbon exchange in Valles Caldera grasslands
National Laboratory : 27 May, 2007
Over the past nine months, University of California scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been working as part of the AmeriFlux carbon exchange research project with researchers from the Valles Caldera National Preserve and Colorado State University using sophisticated eddy monitors, monitors that detect minute changes in wind flow, to study carbon dioxide flow variations and grassland carbon cycle dynamics in a small section of the Valles Caldera.
 
Scientists predict pulsar starquakes
National Laboratory : 26 May, 2007
Scientists have discovered how to predict earthquake-like events in pulsars, the dense remains of exploded stars. These are violent episodes that likely crack a pulsar's dense crust and momentarily increase its spin rate.
 
High energy gamma rays may emanate in the Milky Way
National Laboratory : 26 May, 2007
Los Alamos scientists, in collaboration with researchers from nine institutions across the United States, have evidence from the Laboratory's Milagro telescope that TeV (one trillion electron volts) gamma rays, the most energetic form of electromagnetic radiation known, can originate in the plane of the Milky Way galaxy. The discovery is the first evidence of such high-energy gamma rays arising from interactions of cosmic rays with matter in our galaxy.
 
Drought, heat and bark beetles a deadly trio
National Laboratory : 26 May, 2007
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, working in collaboration with scientists from the University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University, the U. S. Geological Survey, and four additional universities, believe that severe drought, coupled with high temperatures and a bark beetle coup de grace, was the cause of death for millions of pi
 
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